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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Crisis Intervention

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving unaccompanied minor youth. The project recommends the following: 1) prevent homelessness by strengthening family, school, and community structures to support youth; 2) quickly provide crisis intervention services and assessment to recently homeless youth; 3) refer to longer-term housing and services for minor youth who cannot immediately return home or to extended family. 

Accession number
25461
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…

Crisis Response With Street-involved Youth

Crisis Response With Street-involved Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes basic strategies service providers can use to keep themselves, their clients, and other clients as safe as possible during a crisis. It also discusses how, at the same time, service providers can affirm clients in their strength and resilience in surviving and assure them that they will be supported, not abandoned. It discusses situations among homeless youth such as injury due to violence and suicidality, and how these crisis situations may be de-escalated. It stresses that service providers should not hesitate to involve other caregivers and professionals during a crisis and that ignoring the risk of escalation to repeat injury, aggression, and suicide will not make it go away. 

Accession number
25433
Authors
Kozloff, N., Bergmans, Y., Snider, C., Langley, J., Stergiopoulos, V.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.

A Trauma-Informed Model for Empowerment Programs Targeting Vulnerable Youth

A Trauma-Informed Model for Empowerment Programs Targeting Vulnerable Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article investigates the relationship between trauma and empowerment programs aimed at youth. It reviews how trauma can affect participants in youth-led programs; the characteristics of effective, trauma-informed, youth empowerment programs; and ways an empowerment program can increase the resiliency and psychological well-being of trauma-exposed youth. Involving youth in program planning, organizing, and implementation can encourage them to participate in their communities and increase their sense of agency. The authors describe what they view as the core components of a youth empowerment program and propose a model for creating trauma-informed programs. Effective trauma-informed youth empowerment programs involve the interaction among staff, youth, program context, activities, and evaluation. Program staff should understand the prevalence, effects, and signs of trauma and be skilled in working with youth who have experienced trauma. Youth voices and autonomy should be recognized and encouraged and activities should be designed to increase participants’ self-esteem and self-efficacy. Both process and outcome evaluations are valuable for ensuring youth satisfaction with the program and identifying program effects on youth participants.

Accession number
25383
Authors
Bulanda, J., Johnson, T.B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Series
Volume 33 Issue 4
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full text available by subscription or purchase. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-015-0427-z

2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report

2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides key information on the thousands of youth in crisis who contacted the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) in 2016. In addition to the data collected by NRS during interactions with people who contact the Safeline, the report also comments on and analyzes the data to identify trends and illuminate reasons youth contacted NRS. NRS responded to 29,806 inquiries from youth and adults seeking help and information. Almost 75 percent of contacts were youth, 9 percent identified themselves as parents, and 6 percent said they contacted NRS about a friend. Twenty-eight percent of crisis contacts were about youth on the street, down from 56 percent of contacts in 2011, reflecting a trend of more youth seeking help before they are in a dangerous situation. Of contacts regarding youth on the street, 5,446 were depending on friends and relatives, 715 on shelters and soup kitchens, and 562 on employment. Panhandling and engaging in survival sex were also listed as means of survival on the street, with 180 and 106 reports, respectively. Crisis contacts reported many issues, including family dynamics (22,592 reports), emotional and/or verbal abuse (6,221 reports), and physical abuse or assault (4,395 reports). The Safeline provided numerous services and referrals in 2016, such as facilitating conference calls between youth and youth-serving organizations (2,436), relaying messages between parents or guardians and children (71), arranging conference calls between parents or guardians and children (519), and issuing 393 bus tickets through Greyhound’s Home Free program. Most contacts learn about NRS via the Internet (67 percent) or word of mouth (11 percent).

Accession number
25382
Authors
National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth, National Runaway Safeline, Family and Youth Services Bureau
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2017