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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Couch Surfing

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents emerging findings regarding couch surfing and youth homelessness. The authors use data from a national survey of 13,113 adults with youth ages 13 to 25 in their households or who are themselves ages 18 to 25. Findings suggest that couch surfing is relatively common, particularly among the older age group in this study. Households with youth in these age ranges reported couch surfing in the last 12 months: 4 percent among the younger youth and 20 percent among the older youth. The authors found notable social, economic, and educational differences between youth reporting homelessness and those reporting only couch surfing. However, most youth who reported experiencing homelessness also reported couch surfing. Youth who experienced both circumstances presented high levels of socioeconomic vulnerability. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25627
Authors
Curry, S.R., Morton, M., Matjasko, J.L., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Schlueter, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Student Homelessness in Rural America

Student Homelessness in Rural America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents national and state-level trends showing the highest rate of growth for student homelessness is occurring in rural communities. The U.S. Census Bureau defines rural communities as those located geographically outside of urbanized areas with fewer than 2,500 residents. ICPH found that over four school years from 2013 to 2017, the number of homeless students in rural areas increased by 11% compared with 3% nationwide. This report discusses the challenges of identifying and supporting these students and their families, federal funding levels to rural school districts, and the obstacles these students face specific to their rural environment. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25716
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Series
Community
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/ruralreport/#thirty-eight-states-experi…

State Index on Youth Homelessness

State Index on Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In partnership with the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, the True Colors Fund developed the State Index on Youth Homelessness (the Index) as a summary of some of the legal, systemic, and environmental barriers youth experiencing homelessness face. The Index looks at 61 metrics in all 50 states and District of Columbia. The metrics evaluate each state’s laws and policies, systems, and environments that affect youth experiencing homelessness and influence state policy and program implementation. The Index provides recommendations for each state on how to better protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness.

Accession number
25677
Authors
Rush, J., Santos, M.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

True Colors Fund and the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the True Colors Fund website at: https://truecolorsfund.org/index/

Prevalence and Correlates of Youth Homelessness in the United States

Prevalence and Correlates of Youth Homelessness in the United States
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to address gaps in the credible data on the size and characteristics of the unaccompanied, homeless youth population in the U.S. Using a nationally representative phone-based survey (N=26,161), the researchers solicited household and individual reports on different types of youth homelessness. Household reports on adolescents aged 13-17 and young adults aged 18-25, as well as self-reports from young adults aged 18-25, were collected. Follow-up interviews with a subsample of 150 respondents provided additional information on youth experiences and enabled adjustment for inclusion errors. Results indicate that over a 12-month period, approximately 3.0 percent of households with 13- to 17-year-olds reported explicit youth homelessness (including running away or being asked to leave) and 1.3 percent reported experiences that solely involved couch surfing, resulting in an overall 4.3 percent household prevalence of any homelessness. For 18- to 25-year-olds, household prevalence estimates were 5.9 percent for explicitly reported homelessness, 6.6 percent for couch surfing only, and 12.5 percent overall. The 12-month population prevalence estimates, available only for 18- to 25-year-olds, were 5.2 percent, 4.5 percent, and 9.7 percent, respectively. Prevalence rates were similar across rural and nonrural counties. Higher risk of homelessness was observed among young parents; black, Hispanic, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender youth; and those who did not complete high school. The prevalence and incidence of youth homelessness reveal a significant need for prevention and youth-centric systems and services, as well as strategies to address disproportionate risks of certain subpopulations. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25401
Authors
Morton, M.H., Dworsky, A., Matjasko, J.L., Curry, S.R., Schlueter, D., Chavez, R., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

Chapin Hall at University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Journal Name

Journal of Adolescent Health

Volume new
62
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download at the journal website: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X(17)30503-7/pdf

Missed Opportunities in Youth Pathways Through Homelessness

Missed Opportunities in Youth Pathways Through Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the sixth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents data from the in-depth interview component of the Voices of Youth Count report. The researchers conducted 215 interviews with youth, ages 13 to 25, from five diverse counties across the United States: Cook County, Illinois; Philadelphia County, PA; San Diego County, CA; Travis County, TX; and Walla Walla County, WA. The findings show young people who deal with housing instability experience significant adversity, family disruption, and interpersonal trauma both before and after their homelessness. This brief recommends revisions within the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Authorizing Legislation (RHYA) based on these findings.

Accession number
25840
Authors
Samuels, G.M., Cerven, C., Curry, S., Robinson, S.R., Patel, S.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: http://voicesofyouthcount.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ChapinHall_VoY…

Evicted? Doubled Up? Your Child Has the Right to Stay in School! A Know Your Rights Toolkit for Families who Lack Stable Housing

Evicted? Doubled Up? Your Child Has the Right to Stay in School! A Know Your Rights Toolkit for Families who Lack Stable Housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit provides information about how the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act protects the rights of children and youth to stay in their schools while their families are experiencing homelessness or housing instability. It provides resources to help parents understand their children’s educational rights and whom they can contact at the school system level and how to seek legal representation.

Accession number
25730
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the NLCHP website at: https://nlchp.org//wp-content/uploads/2019/02/mvtoolkitfederal2019.pdf

Count Me! Hidden in Plain Sight: Documenting Homeless Youth Populations

Count Me! Hidden in Plain Sight: Documenting Homeless Youth Populations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes the process used by Bill Wilson Center to count the population of homeless youth and young adults, ages 13 to 25, in Santa Clara County, California. The count was undertaken to determine the extent of youth homelessness in the area and plan services accordingly. Two distinct counts took place--the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Point-in-Time count was conducted in January 2017 and a high school and community college survey was administered to a sampling of schools during winter 2016 through spring 2017. The report also includes information on high risk populations for homelessness and results of a study completed by the University of Southern California (USC) on the characteristrics of 208 homeless street young adults to help compile a unique profile of this population. Findings of the homeless student survey are that 17 percent of surveyed high school students indicated they were unhoused or knew another youth who was homeless. Forty-four percent of community college students reported experiencing homelessness or knowing someone who was homeless sometime in the past six months. Of the 208 homeless street youth who participated in the USC survey, 40 percent qualified as chronically homeless, 45 percent were kicked out of the family home, 43 percent had a caregiver in prison, and 25 percent were parents themselves. The report also provides lessons learned while planning and undertaking the study and recommendations for conducting a count that provides a more complete picture of the issue than the HUD point-in-time count.  

Accession number
25390
Authors
Bill Wilson Center
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Bill Wilson Center: http://acouchisnotahome.org/acouchisnotahome/home.html.