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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Child Welfare Services

Family First Prevention Services Act: Implications for Addressing Youth Homelessness

Family First Prevention Services Act: Implications for Addressing Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This paper from the National Network for Youth (NN4Y) looks at how the Family First Prevention Services Act (Family First) could be leveraged to address homelessness among youth and young adults involved in the foster care system. Family First offers important new options to prevent young people’s entry into foster care and to challenge states to use congregate care only as a last resort. While the Family First Act was not designed to address youth homelessness, there are aspects of the new law that could help fund services for these young people, prevent some of its root causes, and provide a stronger foundation for collaboration between child welfare, runaway and homeless youth providers, and other youth-serving systems. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25861
Authors
Bardine, D., Paanio, J., Pilnik, L., Miller, J., Bissel, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Network for Youth

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the NN4Y website at: https://nn4youth.org/wp-content/uploads/FFPSA-Implications-for-YH.pdf

FACT SHEET: Education and Workforce Related Policies Affecting Systems-Involved Youth

FACT SHEET: Education and Workforce Related Policies Affecting Systems-Involved Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This resource from the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) intends to inform researchers, policymakers, and practitioners of the federal legislation that govern systems-involved youth. It does not include all legislation impacting systems-involved youth, but rather highlights legislation and grants specifically focused on supporting successful outcomes for youth. AYPF uses the term ‘systems-involved youth’ to describe youth involved in the juvenile justice system, child welfare system, or both systems. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25864
Type new
Brief
Organization

American Youth Policy Forum

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the AYPF website at: https://www.aypf.org/resource/fact-sheet-education-workforce-related-po…

Embracing a Youth Welfare System: A Guide to Capacity Building

Embracing a Youth Welfare System: A Guide to Capacity Building
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the Child Welfare Information Gateway’s Capacity Building Center for States provides guidance and examples that illustrate the Youth Welfare approach for working with youth in foster care. The Youth Welfare approach recommends shifting from a child-focused system that is reactive, case plan-driven, and protection-focused to a more youth-focused system that is proactive, youth-driven, developmentally-framed, and normalcy-oriented. The toolkit covers the parameters of a youth-focused welfare system, the assessment needs of youth, and the good-better-best continuum service concept.

Accession number
25629
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://library.childwelfare.gov/cwig/ws/library/docs/capacity/Blob/119…

Developing a Coordinated Youth Housing Stability Program for Juvenile Courts

Developing a Coordinated Youth Housing Stability Program for Juvenile Courts
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted by a research-practice partnership between a university and a mid-sized county court in Washington State. The purpose of the study was to develop a model for reducing homelessness from within the juvenile justice system. Using a community-based participatory approach, the study analyzed data from local juvenile filings in 2017 (n=555), statewide juvenile court data from 2016 (n=6,791) and 2017 (n=6,866), and qualitative data from workgroup meetings. These data indicate that 20% to 50% of the youth who filed in juvenile court had at least one prior episode of running away or being kicked out of the home. The qualitative data revealed concerns related to using probation to address youth homelessness, the need for better methods of identification, and a lack of intensive family-based services to prevent housing instability. The article presents the juvenile court-based model and lessons learned from the research-practice partnership.

Accession number
25674
Authors
Walker, S.C., Valencia, E., Bishop, A., Irons, M., Gertsseva, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Child Separation Among Families Experiencing Homelessness

Child Separation Among Families Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) uses data from the Family Options Study to explore how often children in homeless families were separated from their parents before, during, and after staying in emergency shelters. This analysis includes both voluntary and involuntary child separations among the 5,397 children in 2,282 families who either stayed with their families in emergency shelter or were separated from their families upon entry. The brief also describes the subsequent separation and reunification experiences of children in the 1,857 families who responded to the 20-month survey and the 1,784 families who responded to the 37-month survey. The findings show children separated from their families were older on average and most stayed with the other parent or relatives during separation.

Accession number
25718
Authors
Walton, D., Wood, M., Dunton, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the OPRE website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_child_separation_…

Child and Partner Transitions Among Families Experiencing Homelessness

Child and Partner Transitions Among Families Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief draws on the Family Options Study--a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-sponsored study conducted to determine whether the offer of a particular type of housing program helps a homeless family achieve housing stability and other positive outcomes for family well-being--to inform the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and HHS grantees in their efforts to prevent and end homelessness of families, children, and youth. It describes the experiences of the studys 1,857 adult heads of households, 677 other adults identified as spouses or partners, and the 4,341 children who were part of the families at shelter entry. Results suggest that housing and family instability are related, and families who stay in emergency shelters have dynamic family structures. About 30 percent of sheltered homeless families reported separation from at least one family member. Family transitions continued in the 20 months after being in an emergency shelter. For example, 10 percent of families experienced new child separations, while 8 percent reported reunification with children who had not been with the family in the shelter. Placements involving the child welfare system were rare at the time homeless families were staying in emergency shelters, but the incidence of such out-of-family placements grew over time. Separation from children while in emergency shelter was associated with additional housing instability in the 20 months following a shelter stay. Finally, additional housing instability following the families initial stay in shelter was associated with child separations as of 20 months later. Policy makers and practitioners should seek to understand parent-child and parent-partner separations and reunifications within families experiencing homelessness. (Author Abstract Modified) 

Accession number
25398
Authors
Walton, D., Dunton, L., Groves, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief, OPRE Report No. 2017-26
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the HHS Administration for Children & Families, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/child-partner-transitions-among-f….

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Child Welfare Information Gateway outlines affordable housing and homelessness services and how child welfare professionals can collaborate with those systems to help families. Although primarily for child welfare professionals, the information may help housing and homelessness services providers understand the needs and concerns of child welfare-involved youth and families and what services are available to them. The guide features grantee programs focused on child welfare and housing collaboration that were part of the Partnerships to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System (SHF) and Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grant clusters. 

Accession number
25676
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/bulletins_housing.pdf

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University discusses how child welfare systems can use developmental science to better support the children, families, and communities that they serve. The Center intended this report for leaders of public child welfare agencies; private, nonprofit organizations; juvenile and family courts; and legislative committees that work on public policy related to child welfare. The first part of this report focuses on child development and how adversity, such as toxic stress, can disrupt healthy development. The second part outlines how developmental science can improve outcomes in three ways: reduce external sources of stress, develop responsive relationships, and strengthen core life skills. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25764
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Series
Science to Policy and Practice
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/child-welfare-systems/

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report reviews the status of current law in all 50 states and 6 territories related to 13 key issues that affect the lives of unaccompanied youth who experience homelessness. It offers an overview of the range of approaches taken by states since the last update in 2012, and the relative prevalence of these approaches. Key findings include: 1) Many jurisdictions lag behind in implementing changes to federal law that strengthen access to education for youth experiencing homelessness; 2) Punitive approaches to unaccompanied youth are prevalent in many jurisdictions; 3) Definitions of unaccompanied youth often fail to be inclusive, developmentally appropriate, and nonjudgmental; 4) Many jurisdictions authorize or require provision of health care, education, and other services to unaccompanied youth even in the absence of parental consent; and 5) Most jurisdictions provide youth with some ability to act on their own behalf. This collaborative publication from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and the National Network for Youth recommends policy changes to help protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness, and thus increase their prospects for positive future outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25715
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and National Network for Youth

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Network for Youth website at: https://www.nn4youth.org/wp-content/uploads/Alone-Without-A-Home-2019.p…

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the intersection between system-involved youth and runaway and homeless youth. It cites data from interviews with 656 runaway and homeless youth (ages 14 to 21) in 11 cities that show nearly 78 percent of the participants had at least one interaction with law enforcement. In addition, 7 percent of survey participants directly attributed their first homelessness experience with exiting jail or prison. In Part I of the report, the authors describe each of the 10 Principles of Change developed by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in collaboration with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The principles provide a roadmap for communities to help young people avoid experiencing juvenile justice system involvement or youth homelessness. In Part II, the report gives specific resources and examples related to each Principle of Change. Appendix I outlines a case study of Davidson County, Tennessee, as a juvenile court system working to decriminalize and address youth homelessness. Appendix II describes state-level efforts in Maryland, South Carolina, and Vermont that focus on homelessness among system-involved youth. 

Accession number
25457
Authors
Pilnik, L., Bardine, D., Furr, L., Maury, M., Sickmund, M., Smoot, N., Szanyi, J,
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/FINAL%20Pr…