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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Child Welfare Services

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults. This initiative is called the Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH). This issue brief looks at methods YARH grantees used to engage youth in the development of new comprehensive service models intended to reduce homelessness among youth who are in or formerly in foster care. The brief provides samples of YARH grantees activities. (abstract modified)

Accession number
25732
Authors
Gothro, A., Caplan, V.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Issue Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Working with Youth to Develop a Transition Plan

Working with Youth to Develop a Transition Plan
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Children’s Bureau outlines the federal legislative requirements of transition plans for child welfare professionals and other providers who work with youth aging out of foster care. It provides information about the planning process that includes breaking down long term goals into incremental goals that are specific and measurable. This guide discusses how caseworkers can partner with transitioning youth to develop a strength-based plan that supports their needs over time. It includes additional resources.

Accession number
25756
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/transitional_plan.pdf

Understanding Strengths in Relation to Complex Trauma and Mental Health Symptoms with Child Welfare

Understanding Strengths in Relation to Complex Trauma and Mental Health Symptoms with Child Welfare
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a longitudinal study of the individual strengths of youth, and how these strengths related to complex trauma exposure, traumatic stress symptoms, risk behaviors, and other mental health needs. The study assessed 7,483 children and adolescents as they entered an intensive stabilization program with the Illinois child welfare system. Findings suggest that strengths helped buffer the effect of trauma on a range of traumatic stress and mental health symptoms among youth receiving services through child welfare. The authors suggest that early identification and development of a youth’s strengths can help mitigate risk-taking behaviors and mental health and functional difficulties. They discuss the implications of implementing more targeted trauma-informed care and strengths-based assessment and service planning. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25818
Authors
Kisiel, C., Summersett-Ringgold, F., Weil, L.E.G., McClelland, G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child and Family Studies

Volume new
26
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available by article purchase or journal subscription. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-016-0569-4

Transforming Child Welfare Systems: What Steps Can Our Agency Take to Become More Trauma Informed?

Transforming Child Welfare Systems: What Steps Can Our Agency Take to Become More Trauma Informed?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from Casey Family Programs provides child welfare agencies with strategies to develop a trauma-informed approach. It outlines 11 strategies and provides examples to help clarify each concept. The brief includes information about evidence-informed interventions and highlights promising results from two existing trauma-informed programs.

Accession number
25826
Type new
Brief
Organization

Casey Family Programs

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free on the Casey Family Programs website at: https://caseyfamilypro-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/media/TS_Trauma-informed…

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice with Adolescent Brain Development

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice with Adolescent Brain Development
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This paper from the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative offers recommendations on how to work effectively with youth in or emerging from foster care in the following areas: permanence, educational attainment, economic security, stable housing, and supports for young parents. The paper presents the latest research on adolescent brain development and how to apply this research to promote healthy brain development for youth in foster care. Since 2011, the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative has led the Success Beyond 18 campaign to raise the age of foster care to 21 years nationwide and to push for foster care that is more supportive of adolescents and emerging adults. The report is intended for child welfare caseworkers and youth service providers, judges, lawyers, caregivers, teachers, coaches, and mentors.

Accession number
25652
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-theroadtoadulthood-2017.pdf

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents results from a statistical analysis examining the relationship between indicators of substance use prevalence and child welfare caseloads. The analysis used data on child welfare caseload rates and indicators of substance use prevalence from 2011 through 2016 for most U.S. counties. The study found that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a positive relationship with child welfare caseload rates, after accounting for county socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. These substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Increases in rates of overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations are associated wwith a higher proportion of children entering foster care after reports of child maltreatment. Opioid-related hospitalization rates have a relationship with caseload rates comparable to that of other substance types, though alcohol has a stronger relationship than any illicit or prescription substance. Although there is a positive association between the substance use measures and child welfare caseload rates, this association cannot be positively identified as causal. Substance use, including opioid misuse, has downstream effects on childrens welfare and family stability, and these in turn can place a substantial burden on communities. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25426
Authors
Ghertner, R., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Radel, L., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/relationship-between-substance-use-indi….

The Parameters of Youth Welfare

The Parameters of Youth Welfare
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Capacity Building Center for States, a collaborative funded by the Children’s Bureau, offers guidelines to child welfare agencies on how to shift from being a child-focused welfare system to a youth-focused welfare system. A child-focused system is considered reactive and case-plan driven while a youth-focused system is more proactive, developmentally framed, and normalcy oriented.  This brief outlines the transformations needed at the organization and practice levels to better meet the needs of youth in foster care.

Accession number
25675
Type new
Brief
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Gateway website at: https://library.childwelfare.gov/cwig/ws/library/docs/capacity/Blob/119…

The New FAFSA Is Out: Four Things You Can Do To Help Homeless and Foster Youth

The New FAFSA Is Out: Four Things You Can Do To Help Homeless and Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from SchoolHouse Connection outlines ways in which youth-service providers and educators can help youth experiencing homelessness and former foster care youth with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) process. They should inform youth about the FAFSA, help them complete the form, and help remove any documentation barrier. This brief has resources for those who are seeking additional information about the FAFSA.

Accession number
25810
Type new
Brief
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/the-fafsa-four-things-you-can-do-…

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined how communities are using the Family Unification Program (FUP) to address the housing needs of former foster youth. The researchers collected survey data from 91 public housing agencies (PHAs) with FUP grants that serve youth and from 70 of their partner public child welfare agencies (PCHAs). They also conducted site visits to four FUP-for-youth communities. The findings indicate that FUP implementation with this population varies significantly across communities. Despite these variations, 46 percent of PCWAs and 41 percent of PHAs identified the 18-month time limit on housing assistance as a major challenge to delivering FUP services. The authors suggest additional research that collects data on youth participants in three areas: 1) experiences with foster care and homelessness prior to entering the program, 2) engagement in supportive services while receiving FUP, and 3) outcomes after exiting the program. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25472
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
95
Year published new
2017
Availability

The Atlas Project: Integrating Trauma-Informed Practice into Child Welfare and Mental Health Settings

The Atlas Project: Integrating Trauma-Informed Practice into Child Welfare and Mental Health Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Atlas Project focuses on children and youth who are served by New York City Treatment Family Foster Care (TFFC) programs. The project’s goal is to address trauma experienced by TFFC clients by implementing systematic trauma screening and assessment, treatment decision-making tools, and trauma-informed mental health treatment. This paper describes components of the Atlas Project, initial experiences with implementation, and aspects of the project that can inform integration efforts.

Accession number
25646
Authors
Tullberg, E., Kerker, B., Muradwij, N., Saxe, G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
95
Year published new
2017
Availability