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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Child Development

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) published this brief on the relationships between homelessness, enrollment in early care and education, and young children’s developmental outcomes after they leave emergency shelters. OPRE compared a sample of 925 children, ages 18 months to 59 months, 20 months after staying in emergency shelters with their same-age peers from all socioeconomic levels. The authors used nationally normative childhood developmental measures on developmental delays, school readiness, and behavioral challenges. In addition, the brief uses survey responses by parents to measure continued housing instability following a stay in emergency shelter and child care arrangements used by families during the 20-month period following the shelter stay.

Accession number
25682
Authors
Brown, S.R., Shinn, M., Khadduri, J.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/well-being-of-young-children-afte…

Developmental Consequences of Homelessness for Young Parents and Their Children

Developmental Consequences of Homelessness for Young Parents and Their Children
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article introduces the topic of homelessness among young people who are parenting young children. According to the data presented in this article, 12 to 27% of families who experience homelessness are headed by a parent under age 25, and most have children under age 6. The authors discuss how homelessness can interfere with the optimal health and development for both the young parents and their children. They suggest developmentally appropriate services and supports for both the parents and children that include resources to help them become economically self-sufficient. The authors discuss the two-generation approach that typically involves education, career training, and employment opportunities as well as programs for parent and child health and well-being. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25830
Authors
Kull, M.A., Dworsky, A, Horwitz, B., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Zero to Three Journal

Volume new
39
Year published new
2019
Availability

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University discusses how child welfare systems can use developmental science to better support the children, families, and communities that they serve. The Center intended this report for leaders of public child welfare agencies; private, nonprofit organizations; juvenile and family courts; and legislative committees that work on public policy related to child welfare. The first part of this report focuses on child development and how adversity, such as toxic stress, can disrupt healthy development. The second part outlines how developmental science can improve outcomes in three ways: reduce external sources of stress, develop responsive relationships, and strengthen core life skills. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25764
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Series
Science to Policy and Practice
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/child-welfare-systems/

Aftershocks: The Lasting Impact of Homelessness on Student Achievement

Aftershocks: The Lasting Impact of Homelessness on Student Achievement
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) looks at the educational outcomes of homeless and formerly homeless students during the 2013–14 school year and the implications these outcomes have for education policy in New York City. New evidence suggests that the negative effects that housing instability can have on a child’s education do not end when a student is stably housed. Understanding the extent to which the instability created by homelessness can have a lasting impact on a child’s education is increasingly important for teachers, parents, and policymakers alike. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25865
Type new
Brief
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Aftershocks_2_3_A_FI…