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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

California

State Laws Supporting College Students Experiencing Homelessness

State Laws Supporting College Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about existing state laws that help college students who are experiencing homelessness. Both California and Louisiana require the designation of single points of contact in public colleges and universities. These two states also mandate housing priority be granted to current and former foster care and homeless students. In addition, California law requires priority enrollment for these students. California, Florida, and Maryland offer different tuition and fee waivers to attend college. Colorado and Louisiana have laws related to in-state tuition. As of February 2017, Texas was developing legislation to support students dealing with homelessness. 

Accession number
25454
Authors
Schoolhouse Connection
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoolhouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/stateh…

State Laws on High School Graduation for Students Experiencing Homelessness

State Laws on High School Graduation for Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about how the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) law of 2015 focuses on high school graduation among students who experience homelessness. A list of amendments to the law related to state requirements for homeless students is included. It provides a summary of existing state laws that complement federal requirements from California, New Mexico, Texas, and Washington. 

Accession number
25453
Authors
Schoolhouse Connection
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoolhouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/statec…

Recruitment and Retention of Homeless Youth in a Substance Use and HIV-risk Reduction Program

Recruitment and Retention of Homeless Youth in a Substance Use and HIV-risk Reduction Program
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes methods used to recruit and retain a sample of 200 homeless youth for a four-session substance use and sexual risk reduction program at two drop-in centers in Los Angeles. Using unconventional methods, the researchers retained 91 percent of the full sample at a three-month follow-up assessment with 79 percent of the participants attending multiple sessions. The authors found that using structured materials with a small, dedicated staff helped to reach a higher retention rate with this at-risk population. This article describes the challenges researchers encounter when conducting intervention studies with homeless youth due to substance abuse, mental health problems, wariness of authority figures, and frequent relocations. It is especially challenging to retain this population across multiple program sessions and to relocate them for subsequent follow-up assessments. These retention issues can jeopardize a study’s data and conclusions. 

Accession number
25468
Authors
Garvey, R., Pedersen, E.R., DAmico, E.J., Ewing, B.A., Tucker, J.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Field Methods

Volume new
30
Year published new
2018
Availability

The full-text article is available for free download at: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1525822X17728346

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This white paper is a collaboration of the Claremont Evaluation Center, Child Trends, and L.A.’s Best (a large afterschool program in Los Angeles) that sought to address the knowledge gap related to how afterschool practices can support positive youth development (PYD). The authors conducted a research review to show how afterschool programs can build protective and promotive factors associated with supporting PYD. The paper examines which outcomes are important to develop during childhood and adolescence, which protective and promotive factors support positive youth outcomes, and which evidence-informed practices show promise for afterschool programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25744
Authors
Berry, T., Teachanarong-Aragon, L., Sloper, M., Bartlett, J.D., Steber, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Claremont Evaluation Center and Child Trends

Series
LAs Best: Protective Factors Afterschool Project
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Claremont Graduate School website at: http://www.cgu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Berry_LAsBest_WhitePaper…

Memo from CalYOUTH: Relationships between Youth and Caseworker Perceptions of the Service Context and Foster Youth Outcomes

Memo from CalYOUTH: Relationships between Youth and Caseworker Perceptions of the Service Context and Foster Youth Outcomes
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall looks at the service context for youth in extended foster care and how the youth and the caseworkers perceive the services in this context. The authors of this memo used data from the three available sources of the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH), which include longitudinal youth surveys, caseworker surveys, and administrative data. The report presents the key findings that support increased collaboration between child welfare and secondary education systems and expanding the availability of affordable housing options for young adults. It also discusses the importance of listening to how foster youth feel about the services they receive in extended care.

Accession number
25839
Authors
Courtney, M.E., Park, S., Harty, J., Feng, H.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/creating-effective-services-depends…

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a study using data from a large sample of youth from California child welfare records to estimate the impact of extended foster care on postsecondary education outcomes. The sample includes youth who were in the child welfare system before and after the state of California extended foster care to age 21. The study looks at three outcomes: enrollment by age 21, persistence by age 21, and the number of semesters completed by age 21. The researchers found that extended foster care increases the likelihood that youth under supervised care will enroll in postsecondary education before turning 21 but does not increase the rates of persistence or the number of semesters completed among this youth population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25736
Authors
Okpych, N.J., Park, S., Courtney, M.E.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/CalYouth-College-Enrollme…

Experiences of Youth in the Sex Trade in the Bay Area

Experiences of Youth in the Sex Trade in the Bay Area
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report represents one of six site-specific reports from a national multi-site study conducted by the Center for Court Innovation in collaboration with the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention within the U.S. Department of Justice, the study aimed to estimate the size of the population of youth in the sex trade; describe their characteristics, experiences, and health and service needs; explore what services are available; and analyze arrest patterns and prosecution and recidivism outcomes when these yourh encounter the juvenile or criminal justice system. To complement the quantitative focus of the national multi-site report, this report and the five other site-specific reports endeavor to provide a rich qualitative account that reveals and gives voice to the experiences, perceptions, and needs of the relevant population. The Bay Area researchers conducted interviews with 187 youth, from which they analyzed 136 interviews that met their validity and reliability criteria.  

Accession number
25574
Authors
Jones, N., Gamson, J., Amato, B., Cornwell, S., Fisher, S., Fucella, P., Lee, V., Zolala-Tovar, V.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center for Court Innovation, New York, NY

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Center for Court Innovations website at: https://www.courtinnovation.org/sites/default/files/documents/Bay%20Are…