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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Aging Out of Foster Care

Youth Subgroups who Receive John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Services

Youth Subgroups who Receive John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Services
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the underlying patterns of services receipt to prepare youth who are aging out of foster care. States are required to report John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP) service provision to the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD). The researchers used a population of 68,057 first-time youth who received CFCIP services in FY2011-FY2013 from the NYTD to identify underlying combinations of service receipt that may be influenced by youth-level and state-level characteristics. States could benefit from understanding existing service receipt patterns and gaps to optimize decisions on service delivery in order to meet youth needs and to identify specific services that may prepare youth aging out of foster care towards positive outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25874
Authors
Chor, K.H.B., Petras, H., Pérez, A.G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child and Family Studies

Volume new
27
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download via purchase or subscription at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-017-1004-1

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults. This initiative is called the Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH). This issue brief looks at methods YARH grantees used to engage youth in the development of new comprehensive service models intended to reduce homelessness among youth who are in or formerly in foster care. The brief provides samples of YARH grantees activities. (abstract modified)

Accession number
25732
Authors
Gothro, A., Caplan, V.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Issue Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Working with Youth to Develop a Transition Plan

Working with Youth to Develop a Transition Plan
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Children’s Bureau outlines the federal legislative requirements of transition plans for child welfare professionals and other providers who work with youth aging out of foster care. It provides information about the planning process that includes breaking down long term goals into incremental goals that are specific and measurable. This guide discusses how caseworkers can partner with transitioning youth to develop a strength-based plan that supports their needs over time. It includes additional resources.

Accession number
25756
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/transitional_plan.pdf

Utilizing Coaching to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth with Foster Care Histories

Utilizing Coaching to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth with Foster Care Histories
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief provides an overview of how child welfare providers can use a coach-like engagement approach to work with at-risk youth. During Phase I, a Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grantee in Colorado developed an intervention model to prevent and address homelessness among transition-age youth. The authors describe the Pathways to Success model as an intensive, youth-driven, case management approach designed for youth ages 14 to 21 who are currently in foster care, preparing to age out, or have already aged out and become homeless. Furthermore, the model uses a coaching method adapted from the Co-Active Life Coaching model originally designed for adult and college student populations. Now in Phase II, the grantee has implemented the program in three collaborative test sites that represent urban, suburban, and rural communities across Colorado. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25802
Authors
Prendergast, T., Davis, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Policy Research

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Center for Policy Research website at: https://centerforpolicyresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/RB2_Coaching_Fin…

Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences

Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. For the second phase, six of the 18 organizations received funding to refine and test their comprehensive service models with a three-year implementation grant. This issue brief describes the challenges, lessons learned, and next steps of one grantee—Lighthouse Youth Services in Cincinnati, Ohio. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25490
Authors
Hicks, M., Harding, J., Mecum, B.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Lessons from the Field
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This policy brief from Chapin Hall explores how young people leave foster care among those who first enter care between ages 13 and 17. The researchers used data from a longitudinal foster care archive of approximately 3 million children nationwide. They analyzed reasons for leaving care by age at first admission and by placement history. They found that age at entry and placement history are both linked to youth outcomes. For example, teenagers who first enter care at age 15 have the highest chance of running away and are less likely to reach permanency than those who entered care earlier in their adolescence, in part because they are more likely to reach the age of majority while in care. Similarly, the types and configuration of placements and the number of placement changes affect the chances of youth reaching permanency or running away while in foster care.

Accession number
25762
Authors
Wulczyn, F., Huhr, S., Schmits, F., Wilkins, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
The Center for State Child Welfare Data
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-the-Differe…

The Relationship between State Supports and Post-Secondary Enrollment among Youth Aging Out of Foster Care: An Analysis of the National Youth in Transition Database

The Relationship between State Supports and Post-Secondary Enrollment among Youth Aging Out of Foster Care: An Analysis of the National Youth in Transition Database
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the rate in which foster care alumni (FCA) use tuition and fee waivers, scholarships, or collaborative supports to enroll in post-secondary education. The researchers used a sample of more than 9,000 FCA from the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) to examine the effectiveness of these programs. The results show that these initiatives can increase enrollment; however, the effectiveness varies significantly by state. Overall, the study demonstrates the limitation of legislated waivers and collaboratives to ensure a large percentage of youth will access and use these programs to enroll and persist in higher education.

Accession number
25787
Authors
Watt, T.T., Kim, S., Garrison, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
96
Year published new
2018

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a meta-analysis of internationally published literature from 1990 to 2014 investigating the impact of transitional program participation among youth ages 15 to 24. The study focused on post-transition outcomes related to housing, education, employment, mental health, and substance abuse. After conducting a comprehensive database search, the researchers found 19 studies, all from the United States, that met their inclusion criteria. They found that the most frequently described housing outcomes were living independently and homelessness. The rates of post-transition employment varied while the rates of post-secondary education were low. Furthermore, transitioning youth commonly reported depression and alcohol use. The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that attention should be given to the potential benefits of transitional program participation on outcomes such as housing, employment, and education. Further analyses showed that these benefits may differ based on study design, sample size, and sampling unit, but not for mean age or gender. Further detailed and rigorous research internationally is needed to examine the characteristics of transitional programs that produce more successful outcomes for youth, and whether these outcomes are sustained longitudinally. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25545
Authors
Heerde, J.A., Hemphill, S.A., Scholes-Balog, K.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Health and Social Care in the Community

Volume new
26
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article and supplement available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hsc.12348

The Experience With Independent Living Services for Youth in Care and Those Formerly in Care

The Experience With Independent Living Services for Youth in Care and Those Formerly in Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This descriptive study aimed to capture the reported skills and resources of youth currently in foster care and the resources and associated documentation of youth who now live independently. The authors drew from a national data set, The National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II, and included both former foster care youth (n=127) and those currently in care (n=106). For youth formerly in care but currently living independently, 66 percent reported having three of the four recommended documents for independent living: 1) social security card, 2) birth certificate, 3) driver’s license, and 4) a form of state identification. No former foster care youth reported having all four of these documents. Of the 10 independent living skills reflected in this study, 26 percent of all youth reported having none of these skills (e.g. interviewing for a job, renting an apartment) while only 54 percent reported having five or more of these skills. In addition, most participants denied receiving resources needed to obtain these skills through independent living services. The authors discuss the implications these findings have for practice and policy related to delivering independent living services. They also offer suggestions for future research.

Accession number
25527
Authors
Thompson, H.M., Wojciak, A.S., Cooley, M.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
84
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for download by subscription or article purchase: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917306916

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Jim Casey Initiative’s Opportunity Passport program is a matched-savings intervention to help improve the financial capabilities of young people as they transition from foster care to adulthood. This research brief presents key findings from the survey data of program participants since 2008. The employment data includes rates, full-time status, average hours worked per week, hourly wages, and training experiences. Results indicate that Opportunity Passport participants seem to be faring well in employment. A higher proportion of Opportunity Passport participants are employed compared with young people in the general population as well as 17- and 19-year old National Youth in Transition Database respondents. However, some participants lagged behind others in employment gains, including young parents and young people in group placements.The brief provides recommendations for how policymakers and service providers should use this information to more effectively support young people. 

Accession number
25653
Type new
Brief
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-theeconomicwellbeingofyouth-201…