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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Aging Out

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults. This initiative is called the Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH). This issue brief looks at methods YARH grantees used to engage youth in the development of new comprehensive service models intended to reduce homelessness among youth who are in or formerly in foster care. The brief provides samples of YARH grantees activities. (abstract modified)

Accession number
25732
Authors
Gothro, A., Caplan, V.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Issue Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This policy brief from Chapin Hall explores how young people leave foster care among those who first enter care between ages 13 and 17. The researchers used data from a longitudinal foster care archive of approximately 3 million children nationwide. They analyzed reasons for leaving care by age at first admission and by placement history. They found that age at entry and placement history are both linked to youth outcomes. For example, teenagers who first enter care at age 15 have the highest chance of running away and are less likely to reach permanency than those who entered care earlier in their adolescence, in part because they are more likely to reach the age of majority while in care. Similarly, the types and configuration of placements and the number of placement changes affect the chances of youth reaching permanency or running away while in foster care.

Accession number
25762
Authors
Wulczyn, F., Huhr, S., Schmits, F., Wilkins, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
The Center for State Child Welfare Data
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-the-Differe…

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a meta-analysis of internationally published literature from 1990 to 2014 investigating the impact of transitional program participation among youth ages 15 to 24. The study focused on post-transition outcomes related to housing, education, employment, mental health, and substance abuse. After conducting a comprehensive database search, the researchers found 19 studies, all from the United States, that met their inclusion criteria. They found that the most frequently described housing outcomes were living independently and homelessness. The rates of post-transition employment varied while the rates of post-secondary education were low. Furthermore, transitioning youth commonly reported depression and alcohol use. The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that attention should be given to the potential benefits of transitional program participation on outcomes such as housing, employment, and education. Further analyses showed that these benefits may differ based on study design, sample size, and sampling unit, but not for mean age or gender. Further detailed and rigorous research internationally is needed to examine the characteristics of transitional programs that produce more successful outcomes for youth, and whether these outcomes are sustained longitudinally. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25545
Authors
Heerde, J.A., Hemphill, S.A., Scholes-Balog, K.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Health and Social Care in the Community

Volume new
26
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article and supplement available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hsc.12348

Parenting Under Pressure: Experiences of Parenting While Aging Out of Foster Care

Parenting Under Pressure: Experiences of Parenting While Aging Out of Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the parenting experiences of 33 youth aging out of foster care. The sample includes 21 mothers and 12 fathers ages 17 to 23 who have between one and four children. The researchers recruited participants from agencies serving youth aging out of foster care and through local contacts. They purposefully selected the sample to reflect the heterogeneity of the mid-Atlantic urban county’s child welfare system population. Findings show the participants balanced the joys of parenting with the many pressures and challenges they faced in part due to limited resources and support. These young parents were motivated to improve the lives of their children and worried about their children becoming involved with the child welfare system. The researchers discuss implications for practice, policy, and future research about youth aging out. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25596
Authors
Schelbe, L., Geiger, J.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
34
Year published new
2017

Older Youth Need Support Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood

Older Youth Need Support Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This fact sheet from Child Trends uses infographics to show the experiences of older youth in foster care since the inception of the John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Act in 1999. It also provides a brief overview of outcomes associated with participation in extended foster care and a policy timeline that highlights child welfare policies involving older youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25768
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S., Sepulveda, K.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/fact-sheet-older-youth-need-su…

Missed Opportunities: Pathways from Foster Care to Youth Homelessness in America

Missed Opportunities: Pathways from Foster Care to Youth Homelessness in America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the seventh in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief highlights actions that child welfare systems, public systems, and nonprofit organizations can take to prevent young people who have experienced foster care from becoming homeless. It outlines the implications of four key child welfare policies and presents eight recommendations for policymakers, public system leaders, and practitioners to start discussing how to change laws, regulations, systems, and programs to prevent youth homelessness. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25776
Authors
Dworsky, A., Gitlow, E., Horwitz, B., Samuels, G.M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Chapin-Hall_VoYC_Child-We…

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a study using data from a large sample of youth from California child welfare records to estimate the impact of extended foster care on postsecondary education outcomes. The sample includes youth who were in the child welfare system before and after the state of California extended foster care to age 21. The study looks at three outcomes: enrollment by age 21, persistence by age 21, and the number of semesters completed by age 21. The researchers found that extended foster care increases the likelihood that youth under supervised care will enroll in postsecondary education before turning 21 but does not increase the rates of persistence or the number of semesters completed among this youth population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25736
Authors
Okpych, N.J., Park, S., Courtney, M.E.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/CalYouth-College-Enrollme…

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute summaries insights drawn from a collaboration of researchers, practitioners, and local government officials, known as a Community of Practice, which convened to discuss issues facing transitional youth. The Urban Institute defines this population as young people, ages 16 to 24, who age out of foster care without plans for reunification or adoption and who are often involved with juvenile justice. The collaboration looked at funding transitional youth programs using the pay for success (PFS) model. The brief provides recommendations developed by the Community of Practice aimed at local governments, service providers, and other partners considering PFS projects for transitional youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25837
Authors
Mitra-Majumdar, M., Fudge, K., Ramakrishnan, K.
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institutes website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/i…

Fostering Youth Transitions: Using Data to Drive Policy and Practice Decisions

Fostering Youth Transitions: Using Data to Drive Policy and Practice Decisions
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation draws on national and state-level data to illustrate the challenges of young people who are in the foster care system. Data indicate that half of older teens age out without reuniting or connecting with family, one-third move from home to foster care multiple times, half have multiple placements, one-third stay in group homes or institutions, and less than a quarter receive adequate transition services. This report is designed to show state policymakers and other key stakeholders the need for better policies and practices to help improve outcomes for young people in foster care.

Accession number
25654
Type new
Brief
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-fosteringyouthtransitions-2018…

Foster Care Transition Toolkit

Foster Care Transition Toolkit
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Education developed this toolkit to help youth currently in foster care and young adults formerly in foster care access the information and resources they need to begin their transition to youth adulthood. It is also a resource for caring and supportive adults, such as kinship guardians, foster and adoptive parents, guardians ad litem and court appointed special advocates, social workers, and educators. The toolkit helps youth prepare to make decisions independently, advocate for personal needs, manage financial or health issues, and secure housing and transportation. It also discusses how the transition planning process can support youth by providing information about educational opportunities, employment services, mentoring and continuing support programs, housing options, and health insurance.

Accession number
25602
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education

Year published new
2016