Skip to main content
National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Adolescence

Counting All Homeless Youth Today So We May No Longer Need To Tomorrow

Counting All Homeless Youth Today So We May No Longer Need To Tomorrow
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article calls attention to the vastness of youth homelessness and for solutions that scale effective housing and supportive services to address currently and imminently homeless youth. Addresses the implementation of new structural interventions. (author abstract modified)

Authors
Auerswald, C. L., Adams, S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Adolescent Health

Volume new
62
Issue
1
Year published new
2018

Youth Thrive: Research Briefs and Action Sheets

Youth Thrive: Research Briefs and Action Sheets
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This packet from the Center for the Study of Social Policy provides an overview of the five protective factors from the Youth Thrive curriculum: resilience, social connections, adolescent development, concrete support and services, and cognitive and social-emotional competence. The packet includes an action sheet for service providers on how they can implement each protective factor with youth in their care. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25817
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Center for the Study of Social Policy

Series
Protective and Promotive Factors
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the CSSP website at: https://cssp.org/resource/youth-thrive-research-briefs-action-sheets/

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents emerging findings regarding couch surfing and youth homelessness. The authors use data from a national survey of 13,113 adults with youth ages 13 to 25 in their households or who are themselves ages 18 to 25. Findings suggest that couch surfing is relatively common, particularly among the older age group in this study. Households with youth in these age ranges reported couch surfing in the last 12 months: 4 percent among the younger youth and 20 percent among the older youth. The authors found notable social, economic, and educational differences between youth reporting homelessness and those reporting only couch surfing. However, most youth who reported experiencing homelessness also reported couch surfing. Youth who experienced both circumstances presented high levels of socioeconomic vulnerability. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25627
Authors
Curry, S.R., Morton, M., Matjasko, J.L., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Schlueter, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This policy brief from Chapin Hall explores how young people leave foster care among those who first enter care between ages 13 and 17. The researchers used data from a longitudinal foster care archive of approximately 3 million children nationwide. They analyzed reasons for leaving care by age at first admission and by placement history. They found that age at entry and placement history are both linked to youth outcomes. For example, teenagers who first enter care at age 15 have the highest chance of running away and are less likely to reach permanency than those who entered care earlier in their adolescence, in part because they are more likely to reach the age of majority while in care. Similarly, the types and configuration of placements and the number of placement changes affect the chances of youth reaching permanency or running away while in foster care.

Accession number
25762
Authors
Wulczyn, F., Huhr, S., Schmits, F., Wilkins, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
The Center for State Child Welfare Data
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-the-Differe…

Two Futures: The Economic Case for Keeping Youth on Track

Two Futures: The Economic Case for Keeping Youth on Track
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is the sixth in the Disconnection Youth series from Measure of America (MOA), a nonpartisan project of the Social Science Research Council, which began calculating the youth disconnection rate and analyzing its causes and implications for human development in 2012. The project defines disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, as teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. This report presents key findings from a study of the life trajectories of individuals at approximately 5, 10, and 15 years after their period of youth disconnection. The researchers looked at the effects of the duration of disconnection by assessing the differences among individuals who were disconnected for one, two, or three or more years. They also estimate the future costs of disconnection, both for the young people who experience it and for the communities in which they live.

Accession number
25638
Authors
Lewis, K., Gluskin, R.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Social Science Research Council

Series
Measure of Americas Disconnected Youth Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Measure of America website at: https://ssrc-static.s3.amazonaws.com/moa/PSID2018_FINAL.pdf

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice with Adolescent Brain Development

The Road to Adulthood: Aligning Child Welfare Practice with Adolescent Brain Development
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This paper from the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative offers recommendations on how to work effectively with youth in or emerging from foster care in the following areas: permanence, educational attainment, economic security, stable housing, and supports for young parents. The paper presents the latest research on adolescent brain development and how to apply this research to promote healthy brain development for youth in foster care. Since 2011, the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative has led the Success Beyond 18 campaign to raise the age of foster care to 21 years nationwide and to push for foster care that is more supportive of adolescents and emerging adults. The report is intended for child welfare caseworkers and youth service providers, judges, lawyers, caregivers, teachers, coaches, and mentors.

Accession number
25652
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-theroadtoadulthood-2017.pdf

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This white paper is a collaboration of the Claremont Evaluation Center, Child Trends, and L.A.’s Best (a large afterschool program in Los Angeles) that sought to address the knowledge gap related to how afterschool practices can support positive youth development (PYD). The authors conducted a research review to show how afterschool programs can build protective and promotive factors associated with supporting PYD. The paper examines which outcomes are important to develop during childhood and adolescence, which protective and promotive factors support positive youth outcomes, and which evidence-informed practices show promise for afterschool programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25744
Authors
Berry, T., Teachanarong-Aragon, L., Sloper, M., Bartlett, J.D., Steber, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Claremont Evaluation Center and Child Trends

Series
LAs Best: Protective Factors Afterschool Project
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Claremont Graduate School website at: http://www.cgu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Berry_LAsBest_WhitePaper…

Promising Gains, Persistent Gaps

Promising Gains, Persistent Gaps
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is the fourth in the Disconnection Youth series from Measure of America (MOA), a nonpartisan project of the Social Science Research Council, which began calculating the youth disconnection rate and analyzing its causes and implications for human development in 2012. The project defines disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, as teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. The report includes youth disconnection data for the United States by state, metro area, county, as well as by gender, race, and ethnicity. In addition, this report explores how youth disconnection differs in rural, suburban, and urban communities. This research is intended for policymakers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to target and tailor their youth-focused interventions and to assess the effectiveness of their efforts.

Accession number
25637
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Social Science Research Council

Series
Measure of Americas Disconnected Youth Series
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Measure of America website at: http://www.measureofamerica.org/youth-disconnection-2017/

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the national Stop Solitary for Kids campaign is a practical guide for youth justice system administrators, supervisors, staff, practitioners, policymakers, and advocates to begin the process of safely reducing room confinement in their juvenile and adult facilities. It provides examples of this process undertaken by three state agencies and one county sheriff’s department: Colorado Division of Youth Services, Massachusetts Department of Youth Services, Oregon Youth Authority, and Shelby County Sheriff’s Department in Memphis, Tennessee. Data from these jurisdictions demonstrate that reducing room confinement is possible without increasing violence in a facility. Moreover, shifting youth justice facility practices away from punitive isolation and towards models that focus on emotional regulation and behavioral skills helps youth successfully transition back into their communities. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25767
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Stop Solitary for Kids Campaign

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Stop Solitary for Kids website at: http://www.stopsolitaryforkids.org/not-in-isolation/

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving unaccompanied minor youth. The project recommends the following: 1) prevent homelessness by strengthening family, school, and community structures to support youth; 2) quickly provide crisis intervention services and assessment to recently homeless youth; 3) refer to longer-term housing and services for minor youth who cannot immediately return home or to extended family. 

Accession number
25461
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…