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sexual abuse

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Therapy: A Primer for Child Welfare Professionals

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Therapy: A Primer for Child Welfare Professionals
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This fact sheet from the Children’s Bureau defines trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) as a treatment that combines elements of cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, family therapy, attachment theory, and developmental neurobiology to help clients overcome trauma-related difficulties, including child maltreatment. TF-CBT may be an appropriate treatment for children and youth ages 3 to 18 who have experienced trauma or traumatic loss and present with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, behavioral problems, and other related symptoms.

Accession number
25753
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/trauma/

Toolkit for Building Survivor-Informed Organizations

Toolkit for Building Survivor-Informed Organizations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center (NHTTA), a service of the ACF Office on Trafficking in Persons, is a collection of new and existing resources that build organizational capacity to collaborate with and support staff, volunteers, and consultants working for survivor advocacy. This toolkit is for anti-trafficking organizations, coalitions, task forces, volunteer programs, and other organizations who support those impacted by human trafficking. NHTTA plans to expand this toolkit continually using feedback from diverse stakeholders.

Accession number
25743
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the OTIP website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/otip/resource/nhttacorgtoolkit

Interventions That Foster Healing Among Sexually Exploited Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Interventions That Foster Healing Among Sexually Exploited Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of interventions for sexually exploited children and adolescents in fostering healing with this population. The researchers conducted a systematic search that generated 4,358 international publications of which 21 met their inclusion criteria. Based on each intervention’s objectives and delivery method, the researchers organized the programs into five categories: 1) focused health and/or social services, 2) intensive case management models, 3) psychoeducational therapy groups, 4) residential programs, and 5) other. Their review found that most programs were gender-specific, targeting girls and young women with only one designed for boys and young men. The reviewed studies reported on a range of outcomes including psychosocial outcomes, risky behaviors, trauma responses, mental health, protective factors, and public health outcomes. Despite differences in delivery, most of the interventions did, to some degree, appear to foster healing among sexually exploited children and adolescents. The researchers maintain that the findings from this review have implications for researchers, policy and program developers, and frontline practitioners who can partner together to create evidence-informed, purpose-built, and thoughtfully delivered interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25556
Authors
Moynihan, M., Pitcher, C., Saewyc, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

Volume new
27
Year published new
2018
Availability

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Rural State: Interviews With Adjudicated Female Juveniles

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Rural State: Interviews With Adjudicated Female Juveniles
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to better understand domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) among adjudicated juvenile females and to identify factors associated with DMST for this vulnerable population. The authors examined the pathways in and out of DMST from the victims’ perspective (especially rural versus urban). They conducted qualitative interviews with 40 adjudicated juvenile females, ages 14 to 19, in a southern, rural state. The quantitative results indicate 34 percent of the participants engaged in sex trafficking, mostly to obtain drugs, and 31 percent felt forced to perform sex acts in exchange for drugs or for a place to sleep, which was highly correlated with being a victim of sexual abuse. The authors recommend implementing early intervention programs for juvenile females who fit the noted vulnerabilities to prevent this population from being victimized. They suggest learning more about risk factors, especially contentious family dynamics, so that social workers and foster parents can help these young women before they age out of foster care or the juvenile justice system and fall prey to traffickers.

Accession number
25581
Authors
Perkins, E.B., Ruiz, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
34
Year published new
2017
Availability

Comprehensive Care Model for Sex Trafficking Survivors

Comprehensive Care Model for Sex Trafficking Survivors
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that aimed to identify what aftercare services are available to domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) survivors through residential treatment centers in the United States. The researchers identified 10 residential treatment centers that met their inclusion criteria for this qualitative study. They interviewed staff from five different residential treatment centers that provide services exclusively to DMST survivors. The participants described the range of services offered to meet the needs of survivors after their trafficking experience. Their responses helped the researchers expand upon an aftercare model developed in 2011 to include education re-entry, family reunification, family reconciliation, and emergency substance use services. This study helps refine the earlier aftercare service delivery model and lays the foundation to develop best practice guidelines for providing aftercare services to DMST survivors.

Accession number
25559
Authors
Twigg, N.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Volume new
49
Year published new
2017
Availability