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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

protective factors

Youth Thrive: Research Briefs and Action Sheets

Youth Thrive: Research Briefs and Action Sheets
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This packet from the Center for the Study of Social Policy provides an overview of the five protective factors from the Youth Thrive curriculum: resilience, social connections, adolescent development, concrete support and services, and cognitive and social-emotional competence. The packet includes an action sheet for service providers on how they can implement each protective factor with youth in their care. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25817
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Center for the Study of Social Policy

Series
Protective and Promotive Factors
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the CSSP website at: https://cssp.org/resource/youth-thrive-research-briefs-action-sheets/

The Prevalence of Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships Among Children and Adolescents

The Prevalence of Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships Among Children and Adolescents
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article describes the study of safe, stable, nurturing relationships (SSNRs) among children and youth in the U.S. using a nationally representative sample of 4,503 children and youth ages 1 month to 17 years. The National Survey of Childrens Exposure to Violence II was designed to obtain up-to-date incidence and prevalence estimates of a wide range of childhood victimizations and information about parenting practices, social support, and stressful life events. To encourage healthy development in children and youth, a better understanding is needed of how exposure to violence and victimization is situated within broader risk contexts as well as those that may be protective or encourage resilience. The authors provide a comprehensive assessment of SSNR factors; examine interrelationships among different indicators of SSNRs; and investigate the consequences of SSNRs for child and adolescent mental health. Results of this study indicate that almost 25 percent of children and adolescents ages 5 to 15 lived in family environments with only moderate levels of safety, stability, and nurturance, while about 1 in 15 had consistently low levels across multiple domains. Lack of SSNRs appears to most heavily burden older adolescents and children living in nontraditional family structures. (Author Abstract-Modified) 

Accession number
25413
Authors
Turner, H.A., Merrick, M.T., Finkelhor, D., Hamby, S., Shattuck, A., Henly, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Journal Name

Juvenile Justice Bulletin

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention website at https://www.ojjdp.gov/pubs/249197.pdf

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau developed this Resource Guide to support service providers in their work with parents, caregivers, and their children to prevent child abuse and neglect and promote child and family well-being. The Resource Guide primarily targets community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being. However, other professionals, including policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, healthcare providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy, may also find it useful. It includes information about trauma, human trafficking, family homelessness, and youth-related issues. The guide is also available in Spanish. 

Accession number
25694
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/guide_2019.pdf

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This white paper is a collaboration of the Claremont Evaluation Center, Child Trends, and L.A.’s Best (a large afterschool program in Los Angeles) that sought to address the knowledge gap related to how afterschool practices can support positive youth development (PYD). The authors conducted a research review to show how afterschool programs can build protective and promotive factors associated with supporting PYD. The paper examines which outcomes are important to develop during childhood and adolescence, which protective and promotive factors support positive youth outcomes, and which evidence-informed practices show promise for afterschool programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25744
Authors
Berry, T., Teachanarong-Aragon, L., Sloper, M., Bartlett, J.D., Steber, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Claremont Evaluation Center and Child Trends

Series
LAs Best: Protective Factors Afterschool Project
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Claremont Graduate School website at: http://www.cgu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Berry_LAsBest_WhitePaper…

Predicting Homelessness Among Emerging Adults Aging Out of Foster Care

Predicting Homelessness Among Emerging Adults Aging Out of Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examines risk and protective factors associated with experiencing homelessness in the year after youth age out of foster care. Using a state?level integrated administrative database, the researchers identified 1,202 emerging adults in Washington State who exited foster care between July 2010 and June 2012. They found that parenting youth, youth who had recently experienced housing instability, or who were African American had approximately twice the odds of experiencing homelessness in the year after exiting foster care. In addition, youth who had experienced disrupted adoptions, multiple foster care placements (especially in congregate care settings), or juvenile justice system involvement were more likely to become homeless. In contrast, youth were less likely to experience homelessness if they had ever been placed with a relative while in foster care or had a high cumulative grade point average relative to their peers. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25628
Authors
Shah, M.F., Liu, Q., Eddy, J.M., Barkan, S., Marshall, D., Mancuso, D., Lucenko, B., Huber, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for download via purchase or subscription at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ajcp.12098

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the service needs of young adults who are experiencing homelessness while they are also pregnant or parenting. The researchers used data from a survey of homeless and unstably housed young adults, ages 18 to 24, collected over four weeks to examine the characteristics, risk factors, and protective factors of homeless parents (n=109) compared with other homeless young adults (n=243). They further compared differences between mothers (n=61) and fathers (n=48). The study identifies unique risk factors and protective profiles for homeless parents and discusses the implications for service delivery needs of this subpopulation of homeless youth.

Accession number
25685
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Jennings, S.W., Maria, D.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Families in Society

Volume new
97
Year published new
2016

Emotional Health Among Youth Experiencing Family Homelessness

Emotional Health Among Youth Experiencing Family Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a study comparing the risk of suicidality and factors that may protect against it between youth who are homeless with adult family members and non-homeless youth. The researchers used cross-sectional data, representing 62,034 eighth- to 12th-graders, to estimate the emotional distress, self-injury, suicidal ideation, and attempted suicide in the past 12 months for youth who experienced family homelessness compared with housed youth. Overall, 4% of youth in the sample were homeless with an adult family member. Among these youth, 29.1% reported self-injury, 21% reported suicidal ideation, and 9.3% reported suicide attempts. The study found that developmental assets decreased the odds of these outcomes for all youth but were less protective for homeless youth. These findings indicate youth experiencing recent family homelessness are at higher risk of suicidality than their non-homeless peers, suggesting homelessness is itself a marker of risk. The researchers discuss the need for interventions among homeless youth to address social determinants of health such as stable housing and adversity in addition to developmental assets. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25686
Authors
Barnes, A.J., Gilberston, J., Chatterjee, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Pediatrics

Volume new
141
Year published new
2018
Availability

A Supportive Adult May Be the Difference in Homeless Youth Not Being Trafficked

A Supportive Adult May Be the Difference in Homeless Youth Not Being Trafficked
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that explored the factors that di?erentiate homeless youth who have been trafficked from those who have not. The researchers recruited a sample of homeless youth, ages 18 to 22, who received services from the Covenant House New Jersey (CHNJ) between November 2015 and February 2017. Results from the CHNJs mandatory trafficking assessment found that 9.6 percent of the 344 youth participants had a tra?cking experience. In bivariable analysis, the researchers found a novel association between a youth having an Individualized Education Program/504 plan and having a tra?cking experience. Educators develop these plans for students whose ability to succeed in traditional educational formats is challenged by learning, social, or functional problems. In the multivariable analysis, a history of arrest was associated with being tra?cked while the presence of a supportive adult was associated with not being tra?cked. Gender was not associated with a tra?cking experience. This is the largest known study to specifically assess homeless youths demographic and social variables for associations with tra?cking experiences. Building upon these findings, the authors suggest researching the order of occurrence (e.g. did the IEP/504 plan precede, co-occur, or succeed the trafficking experience?) to identify risk factors and protective factors to contribute to evidence-based prevention efforts. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25543
Authors
Chisolm-Straker, M., Sze, J., Einbond, J., White, J., Stoklosa, H.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
91
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740918300434