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outreach

Strengths-based Outreach and Advocacy for Non-service-connected Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Strengths-based Outreach and Advocacy for Non-service-connected Youth Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention for homeless youth who are not connected to services. Research suggests that less than 10 percent of homeless youth are connected to services. This means that much less is known about this population than is known about homeless youth who access services such as shelters and drop-in centers. Service-disconnected youth have more unmet needs and more severe substance use and mental health problems. Efforts to connect youth to services are essential to prevent a range of public health consequences associated with homelessness, including premature death. Key components of strengths-based outreach and advocacy include a dual focus on youth and environment; use of paraprofessional personnel; focus on youths strengths rather than deficits, and giving youth a high degree of responsibility in directing and influencing the intervention they receive. Initial research indicates that a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention can be effective with homeless youth. The relationship between advocate and youth is key to success and is an important focus.    

Accession number
25437
Authors
Slesnick, N., Van Hest, E.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined predictors of meetings with outreach workers among 79 homeless youth, ages 14 to 24, who self-reported substance use and were not currently connected to any supportive services. The study found the following factors predicted higher meeting frequency with an outreach worker: 1) being an older homeless youth, 2) not using hard drugs within the past 30 days, 3) experiencing higher levels of depressive symptoms, and 4) reporting fewer drug-related problems. The authors discuss how understanding what predicts outreach engagement can improve service providers ability to connect marginalized youth to resources to reduce unhealthy and dangerous risk behaviors. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25469
Authors
Carmona, J., Slesnick, N., Guo, X., Murnan, A., Brakenhoff, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Community Mental Health Journal

Volume new
53
Year published new
2017
Availability

The full-text article is available for download via purchase or subscription: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10597-015-9919-8

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined income sources among homeless youth who are not connected to homeless service agencies. The sample of 72 youth, ages 14 to 24, reported three months of continuous homelessness and no service connection before participating in the study. The researchers looked at changes in employment and income over time as a result of implementing the Strengths-Based Outreach and Advocacy (SBOA) approach. They define this outreach model as one that emphasizes the relationship between outreach workers and their clients and focuses on strengths rather than pathologies. The results show an increase in employment and legal income from non-survival behaviors while income from survival behaviors decreased. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25782
Authors
Slesnick, N., Zhang, J., Yilmazer, T.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

The Journal of Primary Prevention

Volume new
39
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with journal subscription or article purchase at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10935-018-0511-1

A Test of Outreach and Drop-in Linkage Versus Shelter Linkage for Connecting Homeless Youth to Services

A Test of Outreach and Drop-in Linkage Versus Shelter Linkage for Connecting Homeless Youth to Services
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to engage non-service-connected homeless youth (n=79) in a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention. The youth were randomly assigned to receive six months of advocacy that focused on linking youth to a drop-in center (n=40) or to a crisis shelter (n=39). For all participants, the researchers conducted one pre-baseline assessment and post-baseline assessments at three, six, and nine months. The findings indicate that youth preferred the drop-in centers to the crisis shelters. The drop-in center linkage condition was associated with connecting youth to more services and with better outcomes among alcohol and HIV-related domains compared with shelter linkage conditions. These findings highlight the importance of outreach and service linkage for reconnecting service-marginalized youth, and drop-in centers as a primary service option for homeless youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25514
Authors
Slesnick, N., Feng, X., Guo, X., Brakenhoff, B., Carmona, J., Murnan, A., Cash, S., McRee, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Prevention Science

Volume new
17
Year published new
2016
Availability