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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

mental health

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a qualitative study of 29 young adults (ages 18 to 25) living in permanent supportive housing (PSH) about their feelings of ontological security. The authors define ontological security as a feeling of well-being derived from a sense of order from one’s social and material environment. The study found ontological security (e.g., constancy, routine, control) positively affected the participants’ mental health and well-being, which helped with positive identity construction. An increase in ontological security also related to residents’ social environment and their ability to strengthen social relationships, which supported improved mental health and sense of self. Most young adults in this study regarded living in PSH as an opportunity to start their lives over and imagine their futures in a normative developmental trajectory. 

Accession number
25666
Authors
Henwood, B.F., Redline, B., Semborski, S., Rhoades, H., Rice, E., Wenzel, S.L.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Utilizing Participatory Mapping and GIS to Examine the Activity Spaces of Homeless Youth

Utilizing Participatory Mapping and GIS to Examine the Activity Spaces of Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that employed participatory mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to examine the spatial and social environments of homeless youth as they navigated life on the streets. The researchers recruited 28 youth experiencing homelessness in Portland, Oregon, to assess their sense of community and psychological well-being as they moved throughout the city. The results of this study suggest that youth engage most frequently in homeless service-related activities, and their participation in activities is significantly associated with a sense of community and psychological well-being. The researchers discuss how innovative participatory methods can help better understand the diverse experiences of homeless youth as well as having practical implications. For example, service providers could use the participant maps and activity spaces the homeless youth create to inform targets of intervention and goal setting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25555
Authors
Townley, G., Pearson, L., Lehrwyn, J.M., Prophet, N., Trauernicht, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
57
Year published new
2016
Availability

The Atlas Project: Integrating Trauma-Informed Practice into Child Welfare and Mental Health Settings

The Atlas Project: Integrating Trauma-Informed Practice into Child Welfare and Mental Health Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Atlas Project focuses on children and youth who are served by New York City Treatment Family Foster Care (TFFC) programs. The project’s goal is to address trauma experienced by TFFC clients by implementing systematic trauma screening and assessment, treatment decision-making tools, and trauma-informed mental health treatment. This paper describes components of the Atlas Project, initial experiences with implementation, and aspects of the project that can inform integration efforts.

Accession number
25646
Authors
Tullberg, E., Kerker, B., Muradwij, N., Saxe, G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
95
Year published new
2017
Availability

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This supplement to the 2018 Children’s Mental Health Report from the Child Mind Institute provides suggestions on how to talk about difficult subjects with teens. It discusses how to maintain ongoing conversations about normal fears, how persistent anxiety can develop into a disorder, and why early treatment is best. This guide describes how adults can build rapport with teens by being curious without being judgmental, showing trust, being collaborative, giving praise, and staying calm. It covers general anxiety; social anxiety; social media risks and rewards; anxiety and substance abuse; anxiety disorder, depression, and suicidality; and treatment.

Accession number
25778
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Child Mind Institute

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Mind Institute website at: https://childmind.org/downloads/CMHR_2018_Supplement.pdf

Supporting Brain Development in Traumatized Children and Youth

Supporting Brain Development in Traumatized Children and Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This fact sheet from the Children’s Bureau provides an overview of the effects of early trauma on brain development, including abusive head trauma (ABT), and how child welfare professionals can help promote healthy brain development through supportive services. It provides information about screening for developmental delays and identifying children and youth affected by trauma in their care. Next, this fact sheet looks at treatment options for trauma-affected children and youth.

Accession number
25752
Type new
Brief
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Welfare Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/braindevtrauma/

Suicide and Homelessness: Data Trends in Suicide and Mental Health Among Homeless Populations

Suicide and Homelessness: Data Trends in Suicide and Mental Health Among Homeless Populations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This factsheet provides data on the prevalence of suicide in the United States and information about common risk factors for the general population and the increased risks among homeless populations. The National Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Council developed this factsheet as part of a series related to emerging issues in the HCH field.  It includes data from a 2017 study that found school-age children and youth who are homeless are three times more likely to attempt suicide than their housed peers. The factsheet provides resources for additional information and support, including the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. A list of references for the data sources is also provided. 

Accession number
25549
Authors
Poe, B.
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Health Care for the Homeless Council

Year published new
2018

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau developed this Resource Guide to support service providers in their work with parents, caregivers, and their children to prevent child abuse and neglect and promote child and family well-being. The Resource Guide primarily targets community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being. However, other professionals, including policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, healthcare providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy, may also find it useful. It includes information about trauma, human trafficking, family homelessness, and youth-related issues. The guide is also available in Spanish. 

Accession number
25694
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/guide_2019.pdf

Social Support Networks and the Mental Health of Runaway and Homeless Youth

Social Support Networks and the Mental Health of Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the relationship between personal support network resources and mental health among runaway and homeless youth. The survey results from 693 participants in Atlanta, Georgia, indicate that more supportive network ties reduce the risk of symptoms of severe mental illness among youth who have been homeless. The study found that those young people homeless for more than 6 months reported having fewer personal network resources. According to the authors, the most significant finding was that age was an independently negative factor for certain types of support resources. That is, the older youth had less support from friends and coworkers than their younger peers. These findings suggest that increased isolation and fewer resources may negatively affect the mental and well-being of runaway and homeless youth as they grow older and stay on the street longer. 

Accession number
25465
Authors
Wright, E.R., Attell, B.K., Ruel, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Social Sciences

Volume new
6
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download at: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/6/4/117

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a literature review that evaluated the effectiveness of psychological interventions for runaway and homeless youth in terms of mental health outcomes. The author identified five types of psychological interventions in 11 studies: art therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based interventions, family therapy, motivational interviewing, and strengths-based interventions. The findings show that family therapies are likely helpful for cases involving substance abuse and CBT-based interventions may work best for youth suffering from depression. However, the review did not find support for the effectiveness of any of the psychological interventions on mental health outcomes. In addition to recommending further research, the author encourages mental health nurses to assess the mental health status of runaway and homeless youth and provide timely and effective interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25740
Authors
Noh, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Series
Clinical Scholarship
Volume new
50
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with a subscription or article purchase at: https://sigmapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jnu.12402