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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

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Youth Specific FAQs for Coordinated Entry

Youth Specific FAQs for Coordinated Entry
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) developed these FAQs about the coordinated entry (CE) processes specific to working with runaway and homeless youth populations. This document provides guidance for Continuums of Care (CoCs) and youth-serving providers about developing and implementing a CE process that is responsive and developmentally appropriate to the needs of youth.

Accession number
25614
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the HUD Exchange website at: https://www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/Coordinated-Entry-and-…

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents emerging findings regarding couch surfing and youth homelessness. The authors use data from a national survey of 13,113 adults with youth ages 13 to 25 in their households or who are themselves ages 18 to 25. Findings suggest that couch surfing is relatively common, particularly among the older age group in this study. Households with youth in these age ranges reported couch surfing in the last 12 months: 4 percent among the younger youth and 20 percent among the older youth. The authors found notable social, economic, and educational differences between youth reporting homelessness and those reporting only couch surfing. However, most youth who reported experiencing homelessness also reported couch surfing. Youth who experienced both circumstances presented high levels of socioeconomic vulnerability. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25627
Authors
Curry, S.R., Morton, M., Matjasko, J.L., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Schlueter, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a qualitative study of 29 young adults (ages 18 to 25) living in permanent supportive housing (PSH) about their feelings of ontological security. The authors define ontological security as a feeling of well-being derived from a sense of order from one’s social and material environment. The study found ontological security (e.g., constancy, routine, control) positively affected the participants’ mental health and well-being, which helped with positive identity construction. An increase in ontological security also related to residents’ social environment and their ability to strengthen social relationships, which supported improved mental health and sense of self. Most young adults in this study regarded living in PSH as an opportunity to start their lives over and imagine their futures in a normative developmental trajectory. 

Accession number
25666
Authors
Henwood, B.F., Redline, B., Semborski, S., Rhoades, H., Rice, E., Wenzel, S.L.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) published this brief on the relationships between homelessness, enrollment in early care and education, and young children’s developmental outcomes after they leave emergency shelters. OPRE compared a sample of 925 children, ages 18 months to 59 months, 20 months after staying in emergency shelters with their same-age peers from all socioeconomic levels. The authors used nationally normative childhood developmental measures on developmental delays, school readiness, and behavioral challenges. In addition, the brief uses survey responses by parents to measure continued housing instability following a stay in emergency shelter and child care arrangements used by families during the 20-month period following the shelter stay.

Accession number
25682
Authors
Brown, S.R., Shinn, M., Khadduri, J.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/well-being-of-young-children-afte…

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This one-page summary from Chapin Hall presents five findings from a study designed to help communities to develop coordinated, system-level responses to youth homelessness. Using a large national data set, the researchers analyze how risk assessment scores of young people, ages 15 to 22, relate to the services they receive. The researchers provide recommendations for stakeholders regarding coordinated entry, assessment, and support for youth in their communities. 

Accession number
25735
Authors
Morton, M., Rice, E., Blondin, M., Hsu, H., Kull, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/1pgr_Toward-a-System-Resp…

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined how communities are using the Family Unification Program (FUP) to address the housing needs of former foster youth. The researchers collected survey data from 91 public housing agencies (PHAs) with FUP grants that serve youth and from 70 of their partner public child welfare agencies (PCHAs). They also conducted site visits to four FUP-for-youth communities. The findings indicate that FUP implementation with this population varies significantly across communities. Despite these variations, 46 percent of PCWAs and 41 percent of PHAs identified the 18-month time limit on housing assistance as a major challenge to delivering FUP services. The authors suggest additional research that collects data on youth participants in three areas: 1) experiences with foster care and homelessness prior to entering the program, 2) engagement in supportive services while receiving FUP, and 3) outcomes after exiting the program. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25472
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
95
Year published new
2017
Availability

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at disruptions that often coincide with the experience of housing stability, such as mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism, can threaten the educational stability. Consequently, these school instability factors may negatively affect academic performance and ruin a student’s ability to graduate. This report focuses on mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism and how to support students experiencing homelessness so they can fully experience the same educational opportunities as their housed peers. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25726
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SH_SchoolInstability…

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau developed this Resource Guide to support service providers in their work with parents, caregivers, and their children to prevent child abuse and neglect and promote child and family well-being. The Resource Guide primarily targets community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being. However, other professionals, including policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, healthcare providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy, may also find it useful. It includes information about trauma, human trafficking, family homelessness, and youth-related issues. The guide is also available in Spanish. 

Accession number
25694
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/guide_2019.pdf

Still Hungry and Homeless in College

Still Hungry and Homeless in College
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the third report in a series from the Wisconsin Hope Lab that examines food and housing insecurity among undergraduates in the US. The first two reports focused on community college students, while this report presents findings from a survey of students attending four-year institutions. The researchers found 36 percent of university students reported being food insecure in the 30 days preceding the survey compared with 42 percent of community college students. Similarly, 36 percent of university students reported being housing insecure in the last year compared with 51 percent of community college students. Homelessness was 9 percent versus 12 percent, respectively. The researchers contend these findings indicate unmet basic needs disproportionately affect more marginalized students who often work long hours in addition to their academic workloads. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25618
Authors
Goldrick-Rab, S., Richardson, J., Schneider, J., Hernandez, A., Cady, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Wisconsin HOPE Lab

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Hope Center website: https://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Wisconsin-HOPE-Lab-…

State Laws Supporting College Students Experiencing Homelessness

State Laws Supporting College Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about existing state laws that help college students who are experiencing homelessness. Both California and Louisiana require the designation of single points of contact in public colleges and universities. These two states also mandate housing priority be granted to current and former foster care and homeless students. In addition, California law requires priority enrollment for these students. California, Florida, and Maryland offer different tuition and fee waivers to attend college. Colorado and Louisiana have laws related to in-state tuition. As of February 2017, Texas was developing legislation to support students dealing with homelessness. 

Accession number
25454
Authors
Schoolhouse Connection
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoolhouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/stateh…