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YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth

YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study with the objective to develop a mobile app, called YTH StreetConnect, to support homeless and unstably housed (H/UH) youth and their providers in accessing health care and vital resources. In Phase I, the researchers conducted a literature review on mobile phone and internet usage by H/UH youth and interviewed H/UH providers to inform the app prototype development process. In Phase II, they conducted focus groups with H/UH youth participants to test the usability of the YTH StreetConnect app. From the usability testing, participants proposed improvements to the app, including visual updates to the user interface, map icons, new underrepresented resource categories, and the addition of a peer-rating system. The study found that YTH StreetConnect is a promising way to increase service utilization, provide referral access, and share resources among H/UH youth and providers. The feedback garnered from H/UH youth and providers offers insights on how to improve future models of YTH StreetConnect and similar programs that assist H/UH youth.

Accession number
25564
Authors
Sheoran, B., Silva, C.L., Lykens, J.E., Gamedze, L., Williams, S., Ford, J.V., Habel, M.A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Volume new
4
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available online free of charge: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965613/

Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences and Trauma

Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences and Trauma
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Center for Health Care Strategies produced this brief as a technical assistance tool to help providers screen for exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma among adult and pediatric patients. The brief draws from the findings of a multi-site demonstration pilot study called Advancing Trauma-Informed Care (ATC). The ATC study sought to identify trauma-informed methods for the health care sector. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25741
Authors
Schulman, M., Maul, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Health Strategies

Series
Technical Assistance Tool
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the CHCS website at: https://www.chcs.org/resource/screening-for-adverse-childhood-experienc…

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article discusses the role pediatricians and other health care professionals have in supporting runaway youth, addressing their unique health needs, fostering positive relationships within their families and with other supportive adults, and connecting them with available community resources. This report provides clinical guidance for pediatricians and other health care professionals regarding (1) the identification of adolescents who are at risk for running away or being thrown away and (2) the management of the unique medical, mental health, and social needs of these youth. The authors contend that pediatricians can significantly reduce risk and improve long-term outcomes for runaway youth in partnership with national, state, and local resources. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25880
Authors
Gambon, T.B., Gerwirtz, J.R.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

American Academy of Pediatrics

Journal Name

Pediatrics

Volume new
145
Year published new
2020
Availability

Quality Health Care for Homeless Children: Achieving the AAP Recommendations for Care of Homeless Children and Youth

Quality Health Care for Homeless Children: Achieving the AAP Recommendations for Care of Homeless Children and Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article assessed whether and how health care organizations serving homeless pediatric patients meet American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations. The researchers conducted a web-based survey of federally funded Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Program grantees serving children and youth and found that federally qualified health care center status was associated with meeting more AAP recommendations. The survey results indicate that the HCH programs largely meet AAP recommendations but need to integrate comprehensive care into acute visits more often. The researchers suggest disseminating best practices to support AAP guideline adherence. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25759
Authors
Chatterjee, A., So, M., Dunleavy, S., Oken, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017

On-Ramps, Intersections, and Exit Routes: A Roadmap for Systems and Industries to Prevent and Disrupt Human Trafficking

On-Ramps, Intersections, and Exit Routes: A Roadmap for Systems and Industries to Prevent and Disrupt Human Trafficking
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Polaris Project discusses how human trafficking business models attempt to intersect with and use legitimate businesses to recruit and exploit victims. These legitimate business industries include financial services, social media, hospitality, transportation, health care, and housing and homelessness systems. This report, a follow-up to The Typology of Modern Slavery, also looks at how victims can work with the same business systems to help free themselves from trafficking and begin to rebuild their lives. Polaris examines how businesses could help prevent and impede trafficking and provide aid to survivors. The report includes ideas and personal narratives shared with the authors by survivors of trafficking.

Accession number
25745
Authors
Anthony, B.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Polaris Project

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free on the Polaris Project website at: https://polarisproject.org/sites/default/files/A%20Roadmap%20for%20Syst…

Laying the Groundwork for Trauma-Informed Care

Laying the Groundwork for Trauma-Informed Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Center for Health Care Strategies outlines practical recommendations for health care organizations that would like to become more trauma informed. Using data from the pilot study sites of the Advancing Trauma-Informed Care national initiative, this brief offers a starting point for health care organizations to generate buy-in for trauma-informed care, educate staff about secondary traumatic stress, improve hiring practices, and enhance the physical, social, and emotional environments for patients with histories of trauma. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25742
Authors
Schulman, M., Menschner, C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Health Strategies

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the CHCS website at: https://www.chcs.org/resource/laying-groundwork-trauma-informed-care/

Internet and Social Media Access Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Mixed-Methods Study

Internet and Social Media Access Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Mixed-Methods Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article details a study that looked at social media and internet use among homeless youth for general and health-related purposes and whether their use changes with their housing status. The study also measured their interest in a website dedicated to youth experiencing homelessness. The researchers recruited a sample of youth ages 18 to 21 from a youth-specific homeless shelter. All participants completed a 47-item survey, with 10 individuals completing a semi-structured interview. The study found that participants were able to regularly access the internet (56 percent daily and 86 percent weekly), mostly by using smartphones (66 percent). While experiencing homelessness, participants indicated their behaviors were more goal-oriented, such as searching for health-related information, and less focused on leisure or entertainment activities. They demonstrated an interest in a website for youth dealing with homelessness. The researchers conclude that mobile-optimized websites may be an effective method for reaching this population given the prevalence of smartphones in accessing the internet. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25607
Authors
Houdek VonHoltz, L.A., Frasso, R., Golinkoff, J.M., Lozano, A.J., Hanlon, A., Dowshen, N.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Medical Internet Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available online at: http://www.jmir.org/2018/5/e184/

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a project to implement a screening system and treatment algorithm in an emergency department (ED) to improve the identification and rescue of human trafficking victims. After conducting a literature review on human trafficking, a multidisciplinary team completed a gap analysis between evidence-based best practices and current practices of a level 2 trauma center at a community hospital in southwestern Pennsylvania. The project ED had no standardized education or screening process for human trafficking. The project used a two-pronged identification approach that included embedding medical red flags from a risk-assessment tool into the electronic medical record and creating a silent notification process. Survey results from the ED participants indicated 75 percent reported that the education improved their competence level about human trafficking. The team assessed the success of implementation by the number of victims whom ED staff identified through either approach and how many accepted intervention.

Accession number
25585
Authors
Egyud, A., Stephens, K., Swanson-Bierman, B., DiCuccio, M., Whiteman, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Emergency Nursing

Series
Practice Improvement
Volume new
43
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.jenonline.org/article/S0099-1767(17)30041-7/pdf

Healthcare Barriers and Utilization Among Adolescents and Young Adults Accessing Services for Homeless and Runaway Youth

Healthcare Barriers and Utilization Among Adolescents and Young Adults Accessing Services for Homeless and Runaway Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to determine the impact of discrete barriers to accessing healthcare among homeless youth. The researchers administered a survey about healthcare barriers and utilization to 180 respondents accessing services at three community centers for homeless and runaway youth. This study explores associations between barriers and three healthcare utilization outcomes: 1) a doctor’s visit in the past 12 months outside of an emergency department (ED) or urgent care clinic, 2) a regular healthcare provider, and 3) frequency of ED or urgent care visits. The most commonly reported barriers were “I don’t have a ride,” “no insurance,” and “costs too much.” Less than 5 percent of the youth reported any fear-based barriers, such as “I don’t trust the doctors.” Significant predictors of having seen a doctor in the past 12 months included sexual minority status and having health insurance. Female respondents were more than five times likely to have a regular healthcare provider. These results underscore the need to clearly define healthcare outcomes when investigating barriers to care among homeless and runaway youth as the impact of discrete barriers varies depending on the outcome of focus. 

Accession number
25532
Authors
Chelvakumar, G., Ford, N., Kapa, H.M., Lange, H.L.H., McRee, A., Bonny, A.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
42
Year published new
2017
Availability

Health Care and Human Trafficking: We Are Seeing the Unseen

Health Care and Human Trafficking: We Are Seeing the Unseen
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes an anonymous, retrospective study conducted to build the evidence base around human trafficking and health in the US. It aimed to quantify the frequency with which trafficked young people encounter health providers in the US and sought to describe the health care settings most frequently by victims of human trafficking, whether their situations are recognized by providers, and which expert-recommended screening questions are being used. Of the 173 participants, all of whom were survivors of US-based human trafficking, 68 percent were seen by a healthcare provider while being trafficked. Respondents most frequently reported visiting emergency/urgent care practitioners (56 percent), followed by primary care providers, dentists, and obstetricians/gynecologists. The authors conclude that while health care providers are serving this patient population, they do not consistently identify them as victims of human trafficking. These findings suggest a need for systematic training of healthcare providers in these specialties to improve their ability to identify and appropriately treat these vulnerable patients. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25480
Authors
Chisolm-Straker, M., Baldwin, S., Ga?gbé-Togbé, B., Ndukwe, N., Johnson, P.N., Richardson, L.D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available for download at: http://muse.jhu.edu/article/628131