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The PILOT Assessment: A Guide to Integrating Positive Youth Development into Workforce Training Settings

The PILOT Assessment: A Guide to Integrating Positive Youth Development into Workforce Training Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from Child Trends discusses how to integrate the positive youth development (PYD) approach into workforce training programs. Child Trends has developed an assessment instrument that helps facilitate the application of PYD in youth and young adult training, education, and employment programs called the PILOT tool. PILOT stands for positive relationships; improved skills; linkages across schools, work, families, and communities; opportunities to contribute and belong; and trustworthy and safe settings. Child Trends developed the tool with the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s the Generation Work initiative. This initiative has partners in five cities: Cleveland, OH; Hartford, CT; Indianapolis, IN; Philadelphia, PA; and Seattle, WA. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25770
Authors
Moore, K.A., Lantos, H., Murphy, K., Redd, Z., Beckwith, S.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/the-pilot-assessment-a-guide-t…

The Individual Placement and Support Model of Supported Employment for Street-involved Youth With Mental Illness

The Individual Placement and Support Model of Supported Employment for Street-involved Youth With Mental Illness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes the individual placement and support (IPS) model of supported employment and its application to youth who are homeless. Youth who are homeless have high unemployment rates compared with their housed peers. Housed youth ages 16 to 24 in the general population have unemployment rates ranging between 8 percent and 17 percent, whereas unemployment rates for youth who are homeless range from 39 percent to 71 percent across various samples of youth living on the street or in shelters. The IPS model is an evidence-based vocational intervention that targets individuals who have severe mental illness with customized, long-term, and integrated vocational and clinical services to help them gain and maintain competitive employment. The IPS model follows eight supported employment principles: 1) zero exclusion, i.e., all clients who want to participate are eligible; 2) integration of vocational and mental health treatment services; 3) competitive employment; 4) benefits counseling; 5) rapid job search; 6) follow-along supports; 7) client job preferences influence the type of job sought and nature of support; and 8) systematic job development. In a pilot study investigating an IPS adaptation, researchers recruited from a service agency 20 young adults with mental illness who were homeless to receive the IPS intervention; a control group of 16 homeless young adults with mental illness who received services from a different agency was also recruited. They hypothesized that youth in the IPS group would have greater improvement compared with controls in five areas: 1) ever worked rate; 2) working at follow-up rate; 3) monthly work rate; 4) weekly work hours; and 5) weekly income. The study found that IPS participants were more likely than the control group to have worked at some point during the 10-month study (85 percent vs. 38 percent). Working at follow-up was reported by 67 percent of the IPS group and 25 percent of the control group. The IPS model is adaptable to work with youth with mental illness who are homeless. 

Accession number
25438
Authors
Ferguson, K.M.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Jim Casey Initiative’s Opportunity Passport program is a matched-savings intervention to help improve the financial capabilities of young people as they transition from foster care to adulthood. This research brief presents key findings from the survey data of program participants since 2008. The employment data includes rates, full-time status, average hours worked per week, hourly wages, and training experiences. Results indicate that Opportunity Passport participants seem to be faring well in employment. A higher proportion of Opportunity Passport participants are employed compared with young people in the general population as well as 17- and 19-year old National Youth in Transition Database respondents. However, some participants lagged behind others in employment gains, including young parents and young people in group placements.The brief provides recommendations for how policymakers and service providers should use this information to more effectively support young people. 

Accession number
25653
Type new
Brief
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-theeconomicwellbeingofyouth-201…

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes an evaluation of an intensive client management program, called Promotor Pathway, that aims to help high-risk and disconnected youth overcome significant life obstacles such as lack of education, homelessness, trauma, substance abuse, and court involvement. The Washington, DC-based Latin American Youth Center launched this program is 2008. At the core of the program is the premise that long-term, positive relationships with caring adults, or promotors, is the most important factor in helping youth reach their goals. The team of Urban Institute evaluators conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether the Promotor Pathway program improved the outcomes of youth in educational attainment, employment, reduced births, residential stability, and reduced risk-taking behaviors. They found that youth who had a promotor were more likely than the control group to use services by the end of the 18-month trial period. The youth with promotors were up to 30 percent more likely to receive services for mental health counseling, substance use, public assistance, and legal problems.

Accession number
25597
Authors
Theodos, B., Pergamit, M.R., Derian, A., Edelstein, S., Stolte, A.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge on the Urban Institutes website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/solutions-youth-evaluation-l…

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report examines the quality of jobs held by a sample of 29-year-olds who experienced disadvantage in adolescence and whether employment, education, or training experiences predict better jobs among this population. Using longitudinal data, the researchers identified factors that contribute to job quality: work-based learning incorporating positive relationships with adults, early experiences in the labor market, and educational credentials and training. Based on their findings, the researchers provide recommendations to improve the employment prospects of young people growing up in disadvantaged households. This study is a collaboration between Child Trends and the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25771
Authors
Ross, M., Moore, K.A., Murphy, K., Bateman, N., Demand, A., Sacks, V.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and Child Trends

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Brookings website at: https://www.brookings.edu/research/pathways-to-high-quality-jobs-for-yo…

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the service needs of young adults who are experiencing homelessness while they are also pregnant or parenting. The researchers used data from a survey of homeless and unstably housed young adults, ages 18 to 24, collected over four weeks to examine the characteristics, risk factors, and protective factors of homeless parents (n=109) compared with other homeless young adults (n=243). They further compared differences between mothers (n=61) and fathers (n=48). The study identifies unique risk factors and protective profiles for homeless parents and discusses the implications for service delivery needs of this subpopulation of homeless youth.

Accession number
25685
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Jennings, S.W., Maria, D.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Families in Society

Volume new
97
Year published new
2016

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute summaries insights drawn from a collaboration of researchers, practitioners, and local government officials, known as a Community of Practice, which convened to discuss issues facing transitional youth. The Urban Institute defines this population as young people, ages 16 to 24, who age out of foster care without plans for reunification or adoption and who are often involved with juvenile justice. The collaboration looked at funding transitional youth programs using the pay for success (PFS) model. The brief provides recommendations developed by the Community of Practice aimed at local governments, service providers, and other partners considering PFS projects for transitional youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25837
Authors
Mitra-Majumdar, M., Fudge, K., Ramakrishnan, K.
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institutes website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/i…

Federal and Local Efforts to Support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Federal and Local Efforts to Support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to better understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. During the initial implementation phase, grantees are refining and testing their comprehensive models. This issue brief discusses the rationale for the YARH grant program and the supports the Children’s Bureau provides the grantees through the multiple phases.

Accession number
25734
Authors
Knas, E., Stagner, M., Bradley, M.C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Employment Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Employment Interventions with Homeless Youth

Employment Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Employment Interventions with Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the comparative efficacy of two employment interventions—Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) and Individual Placement and Support (IPS)—among homeless youth with mental illness. The researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial with participants from a homeless youth agency in Los Angeles: 36 participants in the SEI group and 36 in the IPS group. Over 20 months, SEI participants received four SEI components and IPS participants received IPS services based on eight principles. The study collected data at baseline and follow-up for the primary employment outcome (paid employment) and five secondary employment outcomes. During the reporting period, 39 percent of SEI participants and 32 percent of IPS participants reported any paid employment. Across both groups, participants who reported working at baseline had nearly eight times the odds of working at follow-up. The study did not detect any statistically significant differences across the full sample or between groups on the primary or secondary employment outcomes. The author concludes that future effectiveness research is needed to compare the long-term employment outcomes of the SEI and IPS with a more heterogeneous sample of homeless youth using customized homelessness support services and more nuanced employment outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25501
Authors
Ferguson, K.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research

Volume new
9
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/696372

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined income sources among homeless youth who are not connected to homeless service agencies. The sample of 72 youth, ages 14 to 24, reported three months of continuous homelessness and no service connection before participating in the study. The researchers looked at changes in employment and income over time as a result of implementing the Strengths-Based Outreach and Advocacy (SBOA) approach. They define this outreach model as one that emphasizes the relationship between outreach workers and their clients and focuses on strengths rather than pathologies. The results show an increase in employment and legal income from non-survival behaviors while income from survival behaviors decreased. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25782
Authors
Slesnick, N., Zhang, J., Yilmazer, T.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

The Journal of Primary Prevention

Volume new
39
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with journal subscription or article purchase at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10935-018-0511-1