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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

collaboration

Shaping the Narrative Community Stories of Effective Practice and Impact Across the OYF Network

Shaping the Narrative Community Stories of Effective Practice and Impact Across the OYF Network
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report highlights Opportunity Youth Forum (OYF) communities that are working to improve policies and programs for opportunity youth, who are 16- to 24-year-olds out of work and school. The OYF began as a group of 21 community collaboratives and has grown to a network of more than two dozen urban, rural, and tribal communities. Roughly one-quarter (about 1.2 million) of all opportunity youth in the United States reside in or near OYF communities. The authors discuss evaluation findings that demonstrate the variety of strategies being employed across the network

Accession number
25871
Authors
Miles, M., Nemoy, Y., Martin, N.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on Aspen Institutes website at: https://aspencommunitysolutions.org/report/shaping-the-narrative-commun…

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FSYB) presents the results from a collaborative initiative with the Children’s Bureau called the Support Systems (SSRHY) for Rural Homeless Youth: A Collaborative State and Local Demonstration. This initiative focused on improving the circumstances of rural youth by strengthening their connection to support services, community, education, and employment. The SSRHY Demonstration funded six projects in rural areas of Colorado, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Each project worked with transition age youth who had few or no connections to supportive family structures or community support systems. The report outlines the key findings from each project related to collaboration, services, and youth outcomes.

Accession number
25669
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Family and Youth Services Bureau

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge on the FYSB website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/fysb/resource/results-of-ssrhy-demonstration-pr…

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) provides an overview of the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) and Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) programs and reviews the McKinney-Vento and Runway and Homeless Youth Act requirements related to cross-systems collaboration. NCHE suggests strategies to promote cross-system collaboration to support the education of runaway and homeless youth. The brief includes two partnership profiles and additional resources.

Accession number
25721
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the NCHE website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/rhy-lea-collab.pdf

Next Steps for the Seattle Housing Authority-Seattle Public Schools Partnership: Assessing Progress for a Strong and Innovative Partnership

Next Steps for the Seattle Housing Authority-Seattle Public Schools Partnership: Assessing Progress for a Strong and Innovative Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Urban Institute outlines recommendations for the Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) and Seattle Public Schools (SPS) as they expand their collaborative efforts to focus on a comprehensive, systems-level partnership. Partnerships between housing and schools is a developing field. The ongoing SHA-SPS collaboration has built a solid foundation for a productive, sustainable partnership through thoughtful planning and capacity building. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25866
Authors
Galvez, M., Gallagher, M., Brennan, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/next-steps-seattle-housing-a…

Forging Partnerships

Forging Partnerships
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. This brief is part of a series that summarizes high-level themes from a process study of YARH grantees’ activities and accomplishments during Phase I. This information was gleaned from grant applications, grantees’ semi-annual progress reports, and two-day site visits to each grantee. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25493
Authors
Knas, E., Bradley, M.C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) In the Spotlight
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Evidence From the Past: AI Decision Aids to Improve Housing Systems for Homeless Youth

Evidence From the Past: AI Decision Aids to Improve Housing Systems for Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter, a conference paper presented at the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence 2017 Fall Symposium, describes an initiative to create an artificial intelligence (AI) decision aid to improve current coordinated housing entry systems for homeless youth. Using data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Homelessness Management Information System (HMIS), the researchers first determined whether the current rubric used for prioritizing youth for housing assistance is an effective predictor of youths’ probabilities of success. Next, they worked to build better AI decision aids and predictive models using components of this rubric. The study analyzed the most frequently used risk/vulnerability assessment tool called the Next Step Tool (NST) for Homeless Youth. Their analysis indicated that assigning youth based on NST scores is an effective intervention for assisting high-risk youth. Moreover, the researchers believe additional predictive analytics and AI decision aids can augment assignment decisions based on NST scores. This study found much potential for effective human-machine collaboration in the context of housing allocation. The researchers plan to work with HUD and local communities to develop such systems in the future.

Accession number
25534
Authors
Chan, H., Rice, E., Vayanos, P., Tambe, M., Morton, M.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

University of Southern California Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
AAAI Fall Symposium Series
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text report available for free download at: http://teamcore.usc.edu/papers/2017/current_housing.pdf

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a research project initiated by a community-academic partnership to count homeless youth and conduct a survey focused on the health needs of this population. After a four-week recruitment period, the authors counted 632 youth, of which 420 were directly surveyed for this study. They found the following methodologies were the most effective: 1) using an extended counting period, 2) applying broader inclusion criteria to capture those in unstable housing, 3) using student volunteers in health training programs, 4) recruiting from magnet events for high-risk youth, and 4) partnering with community agencies to disseminate the findings. The authors found that the following strategies did not facilitate recruitment: 1) respondent-driven sampling, 2) street canvassing beyond known hotspots, and 3) community agencies leading data collection efforts. Most youth completed the self-report survey and provided detailed information about risk behaviors. In addition, the survey results captured the different housing types, including youth staying in shelters or transitional housing (n=205), those in unstable housing (n=75), and those who were on the streets or living in uninhabitable places (n=140). The article includes recommendations on how to combine research data collection with counting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25516
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Santa Maria, D.M., Ha, Y., Cooper, J., Schieszler, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
41
Year published new
2016
Availability

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Child Welfare Information Gateway outlines affordable housing and homelessness services and how child welfare professionals can collaborate with those systems to help families. Although primarily for child welfare professionals, the information may help housing and homelessness services providers understand the needs and concerns of child welfare-involved youth and families and what services are available to them. The guide features grantee programs focused on child welfare and housing collaboration that were part of the Partnerships to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System (SHF) and Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grant clusters. 

Accession number
25676
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/bulletins_housing.pdf

Achieving Cross-System Collaboration to Support Young People in the Transition Years: A Tip Sheet for Service Providers

Achieving Cross-System Collaboration to Support Young People in the Transition Years: A Tip Sheet for Service Providers
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides suggestions and tips for improving services to youth and young adults across different agencies and domains. Young people with behavioral and mental health disorders have a wide range of needs related to health, education, employment, and safe housing. They may be served by several systems such as child welfare, juvenile justice, and vocational rehabilitation that may or not communicate and coordinate services. Young people may also have needs that are not specific to any system, such as learning skills in budgeting, self-care, and managing interpersonal relationships, to successfully transition to adulthood. Collaboration and teamwork are necessary, therefore, to provide services to youth successfully. One key to success is engaging young people in collaboration. The authors recommend that agencies and organizations develop system-level collaboration.    

Accession number
25419
Authors
Jivanjee, P., Brennan, E.M., Sellmaier, C., Gonzalez-Prats, M. C.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Pathways Research and Training Center, Portland State University, Portland, OR

Journal Name

Pediatric Nursing

Volume new
43
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Pathways Resource and Training Center at https://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu/pdf/projPTTP-cross-system-collaboration….