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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Housing

“TO BECOME THE BEST VERSION OF MYSELF”: Youth-Supportive Transitional Housing Programs as An Essential Resource for Addressing Youth Homelessness. Federal Data Summary: School Years 2014-15 to 2016-17

“TO BECOME THE BEST VERSION OF MYSELF”: Youth-Supportive Transitional Housing Programs as An Essential Resource for Addressing Youth Homelessness. Federal Data Summary: School Years 2014-15 to 2016-17
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Each year, millions of youth experience homelessness across the United States, and they need proven housing models and an array of services and supports to help them achieve stability and independence – all in an effort to ultimately prevent and end youth homelessness. Covenant House International, National Network for Youth, and SchoolHouse Connection published this paper to highlight an essential, but often under-resourced, housing model for young people: transitional housing. This paper shares research demonstrating the effectiveness of transitional housing programs and argues for greater investments and wider availability of this essential housing model. This includes offering transitional programs and other types of homelessness services to minors. The need for expanded programming is great among this population, as the vast majority of students experiencing homelessness are not in shelters or other housing programs.

Authors
National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE).
Type new
Report
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE).

Year published new
2019

“I’m losing everything all over again”: Responses from youth experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I’m losing everything all over again”: Responses from youth experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Purpose: Already at high-risk for adverse consequences associated with daily living, youth experiencing homelessness face additional barriers to health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the self-reported experiences and healthcare needs of youth experiencing homelessness as services in the community began to shut down at the beginning of the pandemic. Method: From May through November 2020, qualitative data were obtained by telephone or Facebook messenger from 20 youth (M = 22.4, SD = 2.64 years) who had been enrolled in a longitudinal intervention study. Results: Content analysis of qualitative data yielded 5 categories and 1 overall theme. Categories were resource availability, financial instability, mental health, relationship conflict, and maladaptive coping. The overall theme was multiple losses. Youths lost jobs, means of financial support for self and family, access to social and healthcare services, meaningful and important relationships, and skills and controls over high-risk behaviors such as substance abuse. Conclusions: Having similar experiences such as social isolation as those of high school students during the pandemic, the youths in this sample experienced multiple and simultaneous losses, needing time to grieve, and leaving them once more at high-risk for adverse outcomes.

Authors
Rew, L., Yeargain, O., Peretz, C., & Croce, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Archives of Psychiatric Nursing

Year published new
2021

Reimagining homelessness assistance for children and families

Reimagining homelessness assistance for children and families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The homelessness response system in the United States is dominated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD’s definition of homelessness, program models, metrics, data, approaches, and goals have overshadowed those of other federal agencies. This policy brief argues that children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness have been poorly served by HUD’s dominance, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. It proposes that other federal agencies, specifically the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Education, are better suited to provide comprehensive homeless assistance for children, youth, and families. The author draws from research, policy analyses, and testimonies of parents, service providers, and educators to make the case for a reimagined homelessness response that is child-centered and oriented toward long-term goals of economic independence, health, and wellness.

Authors
Duffield, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Children and Poverty

Volume new
26
Issue
2
Year published new
2020

Preventive health care utilization among youths who have run away, experienced homelessness, or been stably housed

Preventive health care utilization among youths who have run away, experienced homelessness, or been stably housed
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

"Although it is well established that youths with unstable housing face increased health risks compared with peers with stable housing, there is considerable heterogeneity in youths’ experiences of housing instability, with implications for health, clinical practice, and policy. For instance, adolescents who are homeless with their families may have unique health needs compared with those who are unaccompanied, and youths who run away may be at particularly high risk for poor health outcomes. Given that annual preventive visits are recommended for all adolescents, they may represent an opportunity to explore housing status and address health needs of youth facing housing instability. To inform clinical practice and interventions, the authors sought to compare preventive health care utilization among subgroups of youth who have run away, experienced homelessness, or been stably housed.
"

Authors
Gewirtz O'Brien, J. R., Barnes, A. J., Scal, P. B., & McRee, A. L.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JAMA Pediatrics

Volume new
174
Issue
9
Year published new
2020

Examining the link: Foster care runaway episodes and human trafficking

Examining the link: Foster care runaway episodes and human trafficking
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief summarizes and builds on a 2019 report to Congress, The Child Welfare System Response to Sex Trafficking of Children. This brief discusses the number of youth who run from foster care, factors that place youth at risk of running from care, and the evidence around running from care and sex trafficking victimization. Where applicable, the authors also review the evidence around running from care and labor trafficking. The authors conclude with a discussion of promising efforts to reduce runaway behavior. (Author modified)

Authors
Latzman, N. E., & Gibbs, D.
Type new
Report
Journal Name

OPRE Report No. 2020-143. Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Year published new
2020

Measuring Our Success: Campus Supports for College Students Experiencing Food & Housing Insecurity.

Measuring Our Success: Campus Supports for College Students Experiencing Food & Housing Insecurity.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In January 2019, the California Homeless Youth Project (CHYP), an initiative of the California Research Bureau, be¬gan a study to explore the supply of resources available to students experiencing housing insecurity and home¬lessness at California’s public colleges and universities. This study builds on a previous CHYP report by looking in-depth at the types of resources campuses offer that help students meet their basic needs. It also builds on a growing body of research on food and housing insecurity in higher education—and the actions that are being taken to address these challenges—on a system-wide, state, and national level. The findings in this report are based on information collected from campus websites, phone calls, and emails with higher education staff in order to determine which of California’s public colleges and universities offer resources that address basic needs insecurity. Specifically, we determined if campuses offer year-round student housing, emergency housing, emergency grants, short-term loans, food resources, and advisors and programs for foster youth and students experiencing homelessness. This study looked at 44 percent of the 114 California Community Colleges (CCCs) and all of the California State Universities (CSUs) and Universities of California (UCs).

Authors
California Homeless Youth Project
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

California Homeless Youth Project

Year published new
2019

Student Resilience in the Face of Challenges at California’s Community Colleges

Student Resilience in the Face of Challenges at California’s Community Colleges
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The California Community College (CCC) system is facing an unprecedented food and housing crisis. To better understand the intersecting challenges that community college students face, the needs and resilience strategies of these students, and what state policymakers, campus leaders, and other stakeholders can do to support their academic success, the California Homeless Youth Project at the California State Library interviewed 20 students between 18 and 30 years old who were currently enrolled at a community college or had graduated or transferred from one within the past two years, and had received any kind of housing-related ser¬vice while attending a community college. The findings and recom¬mendations are based on the knowledge, experiences, and insights that these students graciously shared. The interviews reveal that the impact of facing insecurity spill over into all aspects of students’ lives, and that more than a stable source of food and housing is re¬quired to help these students succeed.

Authors
California Homeless Youth Project
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

California Homeless Youth Project

Year published new
2020

Tragedy Response Protocol. COVID-19 Addendum

Tragedy Response Protocol. COVID-19 Addendum
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In 2018, the Hollywood Homeless Youth Partnership produced A Tragedy Response Protocol – a document to guide our collaborative work and support young people in the aftermath of the death of a young person in our service community. The COVID -19 pandemic prompted a review and update of our protocol in 3 ways: 1) To expand the protocol to address community events, like pandemics; 2) To reduce the reliance on in-person communications and ceremonies around loss; 3) To elevate the parallel process of grief between staff and youth.

Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Hollywood Homeless Youth Partnership

Year published new
2020

Job Training for Youth with Justice Involvement: A Toolkit. National Youth Employment Coalition.

Job Training for Youth with Justice Involvement: A Toolkit. National Youth Employment Coalition.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Youth with justice involvement face a complex web of bias, racial discrimination, and structural barriers that prevent them from living healthy and productive lives. The federally funded workforce-development system has the potential to help these youth become economically self-sufficient and increase their chances of success–and has a statutory mandate to serve the hardest-to-serve young people. Collaboration among workforce partners, courts, and the various agencies that make up the juvenile-justice system can create an ecosystem of alternatives that keep young people safe in their community. This toolkit, directed at practitioners and leaders in the juvenile-justice system and others with limited familiarity with the workforce development system:
• Outlines evidence-based practices in youth workforce development,
• Provides an overview of the workforce system funded under the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA),
• Makes recommendations for how to make WIOA-funded services work better for youth with justice involvement at the local level, and
• Lays out some key steps to forming effective interagency partnerships. These ideas are illustrated by success stories from around the country.

Authors
O’Sullivan, K., Spangler, D., Showalter, T., & Bennett, R.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2020

Linking the TAY-VI-SPDAT Tool to Housing Placements and Outcomes for Youth Experiencing Homelessness.

Linking the TAY-VI-SPDAT Tool to Housing Placements and Outcomes for Youth Experiencing Homelessness.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Thisarticle desribes a study that explores the use of the Next Step Tool for homeless youth, what the data say about its effectiveness at recommending specific housing placements for young people with a specific range of scores, and about the impact of homelessness on their trajectories over a period of two years. The paper takes advantage of the 11,000+ records of young people using this tool (currently the most popular) and offers insights into the tool itself as well as the results from housing placements for young people with different levels of vulnerability (do its housing recommendations appear to match outcomes). It does not make a recommendation for communities about whether they should use this or other tools. (author abstract modified)

Authors
Rice, E., Holguin, M., Hsu, H.-T., Morton, M., Vayanos, P., Tambe, M., Chan, H.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Issue
3
Year published new
2018