Vulnerable Youth and the Transition to Adulthood: Youth from Distressed Neighborhoods

Authors: 
Johnson, H.
Type: 
Research Brief (4 pages)
Year Published: 2009
Organization: 
Urban Institute
Series: 
Source: 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Human Services Policy, US Department of Health and Human Services
Abstract: 

The transition to adulthood can be particularly challenging for youth growing up in distressed neighborhoods. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this fact sheet compares the adolescent risk behaviors and young adult outcomes of youth from distressed neighborhoods with those of youth from non-distressed neighborhoods.

Key findings: Youth from distressed neighborhoods do not engage in more risk behaviors during adolescence than youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. Ten percent of youth from distressed neighborhoods have sex before age 13, compared with 3 percent of youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. Twice as many youth from distressed neighborhoods (32 percent) do not earn a high school diploma as youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. About one in three (35 percent) youth from distressed neighborhoods are consistently-connected to work or school between the ages of 18 and 24, compared with nearly two in three (62 percent) youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. Sixty-five percent of youth from distressed neighborhoods are employed on their 24th birthday, compared with 78 percent of youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. The earnings of youth from distressed neighborhoods are 22 percent lower at age 23 than the earnings of their peers in non-distressed neighborhoods. Seventy-eight percent of youth in distressed neighborhoods are from low-income families. Even among youth from low-income families, those in distressed neighborhoods are less likely to be consistently- connected to school or work than those in non-distressed neighborhoods.

Availability: 
The Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037; Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Skype (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775, E-mail: pubs@ui.urban.org, Web site: www.urban.org or http://www.urban.org/uploadedpdf/411948_distressed_neighborhoods.pdf for download or http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/vulnerableyouth/4/index.shtml
Notes: 
Publication available on the Internet free of charge.
Accession Number: 
18883