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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Best Practices

Promoting Positive Pathways to Adulthood: Pathways Transition Training Toolkit

Promoting Positive Pathways to Adulthood: Pathways Transition Training Toolkit
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit is designed to accompany the Promoting the Positive Pathways to Adulthood (PPPA) online training modules. The PPPA training develops the capabilities of direct service providers who work with youth and young adults ages 14 to 29 who have serious mental health needs. The training is also intended for use by peer support and family service providers. To assist with implementation, the toolkit includes practice scenarios, video segments with discussion questions, and role plays based on real-life situations.

Accession number
25644
Authors
Jivanjee, P., Brennan, E.M., Gonzalez-Prats, M.C., Melton, R., Lewis, K.H.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University

Year published new
2016
Availability

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a project to implement a screening system and treatment algorithm in an emergency department (ED) to improve the identification and rescue of human trafficking victims. After conducting a literature review on human trafficking, a multidisciplinary team completed a gap analysis between evidence-based best practices and current practices of a level 2 trauma center at a community hospital in southwestern Pennsylvania. The project ED had no standardized education or screening process for human trafficking. The project used a two-pronged identification approach that included embedding medical red flags from a risk-assessment tool into the electronic medical record and creating a silent notification process. Survey results from the ED participants indicated 75 percent reported that the education improved their competence level about human trafficking. The team assessed the success of implementation by the number of victims whom ED staff identified through either approach and how many accepted intervention.

Accession number
25585
Authors
Egyud, A., Stephens, K., Swanson-Bierman, B., DiCuccio, M., Whiteman, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Emergency Nursing

Series
Practice Improvement
Volume new
43
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.jenonline.org/article/S0099-1767(17)30041-7/pdf

Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Final Report From the First Cohort of Projects

Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Final Report From the First Cohort of Projects
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report documents the experiences of the first cohort of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects awarded as cooperative agreements in 2014. The intent of the demonstration program is to enhance organizational and community capacity to identify domestic victims of human trafficking and deliver comprehensive case management and trauma-informed, culturally relevant services through a system of referrals and the formation of community partnerships. The three projects were located in Maricopa and Pima Counties, AZ, New York City, and Salt Lake City, UT. Key findings of the cross-site process evaluation include: 1) Projects undertook a variety of activities and collaborated with numerous partners to develop and expand organizational and community capacity to identify and serve trafficking victims; 2) Projects diverse backgrounds, target populations, and partners shaped implementation of unique configurations and service models across projects; 3) 341 clients participated in case management services, 95 percent of whom were sex trafficked and 25 percent were labor trafficked; and 4) Projects met many clients needs; however, lack of appropriate, accessible services and individual-level client factors were key barriers to service engagement and delivery.  

Accession number
25412
Authors
Walters, J.H., Krieger, K., Kluckman, M., Feinberg, R., Orme, S., Asefnia, N., Gremminger, M., Gibbs, D.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/research/project/evaluation-of-domestic-vi….

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth: Rapid Re-housing

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth: Rapid Re-housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about rapid re-housing programs targeting homeless youth. The project provides the following recommendations to adapt rapid re-housing programs to the youth population: 1) embrace a client-driven, housing first philosophy; 2) actively engage landlords; 3) provide ongoing services and case management; 4) understand programmatic differences for youth versus adult populations; and 5) be flexible in case management, funding, and outcomes. 

Accession number
25462
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/rrh-for-unaccompa…

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving older homeless youth. The project recommends the following: 1) help youth develop and navigate supportive relationships with family, peers, and other caring adults; 2) offer multiple housing options with developmentally appropriate services; 3) guide youth as they connect to mainstream services; and 4) adequately train and support frontline staff.

Accession number
25460
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving unaccompanied minor youth. The project recommends the following: 1) prevent homelessness by strengthening family, school, and community structures to support youth; 2) quickly provide crisis intervention services and assessment to recently homeless youth; 3) refer to longer-term housing and services for minor youth who cannot immediately return home or to extended family. 

Accession number
25461
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…